Hot Cross Buns

April 4, 2012 at 8:28 pm | Posted in sweet things, sweet yeast breads | 6 Comments
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hot cross buns

Every year I think about making Hot Cross Buns for Easter (or Good Friday, I guess), but I never get to it.  Well, finally, this is my year!  And let me tell you that eating one of these sweet, spiced buns freshly homemade is a real treat.  I made these with currants and candied orange peel, although you could use raisins or craisins or whatever dried fruit and zest you choose. If you are British or Australian, you may not like what I’ve done on top here.  A “traditional” English hot cross bun has a cross made not of icing (like mine), but of a flour and water paste that is baked on.  But what can I say– I’m American and I like my icing!!

You’ll see that this recipe begins with preparing a sponge starter.  It is really easy…there’s nothing to it but a little added resting time.  The sponge lets the yeast get some extra fermentation, which is better for flavor and makes for nice soft buns. The rest of the dough is a snap to put together in a stand mixer.  These aren’t so complicated to make, even if, like me, you don’t do a whole lot of bread baking at home…the hardest part is waiting for them to cool completely.  You bet I devoured this guy with a little salty butter  just as soon as he was cool enough to “cross”!

hot cross buns

Hot Cross Buns- makes 12
adapted (quite a bit) from Bread: A Baker’s Book of Techniques and Recipes by Jeffrey Hamelman

Steph’s Note:  There’s no real need to soak your currants or orange peel unless they are very dry.  If that’s the case, I’d put them in a small bowl with a couple teaspoons of orange juice or Grand Mariner and microwave for ten seconds (cool before using).

for the sponge
38 g AP flour
190 g milk, about 85°F
9 g sugar
7.4 g (2-1/4 t) instant yeast

for the final dough
340 g AP flour
60 g butter, softened
57 g sugar
1 egg
3 g salt
2 g ground allspice
2 g ground cinnamon
110 g dried currants
40 g candied orange peel, finely chopped

for the icing (amounts are approximate)
1 cup confectioners’ sugar, sifted if lumpy
4 teaspoons milk

-For the sponge, combine the milk and yeast in a medium bowl. Whisk in the flour and sugar. The mixture will be very loose. Cover and let rest until it is about 3 times its original volume,  30-40 minutes.

-In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle, mix final dough flour and softened butter until the butter is evenly distributed through the flour.

-Add egg, sugar, spices, and salt. Continue to mix until combined. The mixture will be quite dry at this point.

-Switch to the mixer’s dough hook. Add the sponge and mix on low speed. Mix until well combined, about 3 minutes.

-Up the mixer to medium speed, and mix about 8 minutes.  You can occasionally scrape down the sides of the bowl, if needed. The dough will start to leave the sides and come together around the dough hook, and the gluten should have reached a medium level of development.

-Add the currants and orange peel and mix on low speed just until they are evenly distributed through the dough.

-Transfer the dough to a lightly oiled, covered container. Ferment in a warm place for one hour, giving it a fold (kind of like a letter) after 30 minutes.

-Turn the dough onto an unfloured counter and divide it into 12 pieces (about 70-75 g each).

-Form each piece into a ball. To tighten the ball, place it on the counter with your cupped hand loosely around it, and move your hand in a tight circle several times.

-Place the balls on a parchment-lined baking sheet (I used a 1/4 sheet tray…they did not touch when I arranged them on the tray, but as they proofed, they expanded to gently touch.)

-Cover and proof in a warm place for about an hour.

-Preheat the oven to 400°F . Bake the buns on the parchment-lined sheet at 400°F until the tops are browned, about 10 minutes. Reduce the heat to 350°F and continue baking until browned all over, about another 10 minutes.  Remove from the oven and cool completely.

-When the buns are completely cool, whisk together the icing ingredients.  You can add extra confectioners’ sugar or milk as needed to make a thick, but pipeable paste.  Put it in a piping bag with a medium-small round tip and pipe it in a cross over the buns.  They are best when eaten fresh (although I did freeze a few for the weekend).

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6 Comments »

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  1. These look divine! So excited to try theses out soon.

  2. I”m like you used to be…every year I think I’ll make hot cross buns. I didn’t get to them this year, but maybe with your’s as inspiration I will. There’s still time. Your buns look great!

  3. Looks so yummy!!! I love bread, especially with all that goodness in it!

  4. I think this is my year for hot cross buns, though tomorrow rather than today… :)

  5. love the pics and recipes, of course. do you take the pics yourself, and if so, how on earth do you get them to look so amazing?


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