Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Nutella Buttons (and Concord Grape-Peanut Butter Buttons)

May 12, 2015 at 6:57 am | Posted in BCM, cakes & tortes, cupcakes, groups, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 17 Comments
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nutella and PB-grape buttons

These adorable little two-bite Nutella Buttons (i.e., mini cupcakes) have a surprise hiding inside.  If you guessed a pocket of Nutella, you win!  And if you aren’t a fan of Nutella, or if you just feel like getting creative, it’s pretty easy to come up with other ideas for the hidden surprise.  Jam, peanut butter, ganche, flavored ganache, cookie butter….they’d all be good things to find in the middle of this yellow cake batter.  I did a mix– some filled were with Nutella and others were filled with concord grape jam that I made back in the fall.

I made half a recipe of the cake batter and just did it, whipped egg whites and all, by hand.  I used the optional almond extract, so the little cakes had a kind of marzipany taste to go along with their springy texture.  I split the batter up evenly between the Nutellas and the grape jams.  My buttons didn’t brown on top while baking, but they were done a minute or so early.

I topped my Nutella ones with a little of the milk chocolate ganache I have left from the super-delish Black-and-White Malted Icebox Cake I made last week.  (That reminds me, have you entered my Icebox Cakes BOOK GIVEAWAY yet??  If not, get on it!)  Then I wanted a little flair on top, but didn’t have any hazelnuts in my fridge nut drawer.  I did, however, have a single Ferrero Rocher candy, so I chopped up the crispy outside coating part (I scooped out and ate the center…mmm) and decorated with that.   The grape jam ones got dunked into a white chocolate and peanut butter glaze and sprinkled with some salty peanut bits on top.

Too cute, especially when you find a smile inside!

nutella and PB-grape buttons

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Ka’kat

May 5, 2015 at 6:57 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 11 Comments
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ka kat

¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!  Maybe you are getting a tres leches soaking or quadruple checking a mole recipe to make sure you didn’t miss an ingredient.  If you are thinking about flatbreads today, you’re probably thinking about tortillas, but put Ka’kat on your radar for later.  I had never heard of ka’kat before, but Dorie says they are a very typical Eastern Mediterranean street food.  You can find them everywhere apparently, just like soft pretzels here in New York.  They’re made with a really straightforward yeast dough.  If you make it in the morning after breakfast, you can easily have fresh, warm bread snacks by lunchtime!

Although this is another recipe in the flatbread section of the book from Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid, my ka’kat (at least) came out round and chubby.  With sesame seeds on top, they did not look unlike mini bagels.  Ka’kat are often flavored with ground mahleb (also mahlab), which are little tiny cherry kernels.  This spice has a bit of that bitter almond flavor and is used in Middle Eastern, Greek and Turkish baking.  You probably won’t find it at your standard grocery store, but you can get it online (at Penzeys, for example) or in a Middle Eastern market.  I found whole seeds at Sahadi’s here in Brooklyn (I love that place!) and ground them to powder in a spice grinder.  All that said, the mahleb is totally optional.  It gives a very subtle aroma and taste, and I always like to buy an interesting new ingredient, but you can leave it out, no probs.

These were so tasty warm and soft from the oven.  I ate four– no kidding!  But they are little, yeah?  I dipped them into olive oil and dukkah (like I did with the Pebble Bread)…they’d be good with salty butter, too.   I made half a recipe and divided the dough into fifteen ka’kat to fit neatly on one sheet tray.  I have about half of them left in the freezer and I’ll definitely warm them up a bit before eating them.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Coconut Tapioca

April 28, 2015 at 7:25 pm | Posted in BCM, groups, puddings & custards, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 12 Comments

coconut tapioca

This week’s recipe will probably evoke some strong feelings…feelings of dislike, that is.  Tapicoa is certainly not everyone’s cup of tea (or pudding).  I don’t really even know why I like it, since it’s certainly not something I grew up eating, and I’ve never make it at home until now.  But I think the gummy little bubbles are fun to eat and I was looking forward to making this Coconut Tapioca recipe.

This is a simple recipe but it wasn’t problem-free for me.  First, I mistakenly bought small pearl tapioca, rather than the large pearl called for in the instructions…this is because often I shop first and then read directions.  I used Dorie’s ingredients and method, but tried to cover my goof by following the soaking and cooking time instructions on my package (which are waaay less for small pearl than for large).  The first day the tapioca was a nice creamy consistency, but after a night in the fridge, it was pretty much a solid glob.  I didn’t want to toss it so I folded through some softly whipped cream to lighten it up.  It was much better that way, but If I make this again with small pearl tapioca (and I probably will since I have a ton left in the bag), I’ll either cook it with some extra liquid added or I’ll incorporate egg yolk like other “true” custard recipes I’ve seen.

Despite the snags, I had a good time playing around with toppings for my tapioca. In the picture above, I sprinkled on a little brown coconut sugar and added mandarin slices.  The next day, I used chocolate sauce, toasted almonds and coconut flakes.  Berries or tropical fruit would also be natural combos with this.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Matzos

April 21, 2015 at 12:01 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, quick breads, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie | 5 Comments
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The Matzo recipe from Lauren Groveman is bread at its most basic.  Really, it’s just flour, salt and water, hand-kneaded and with no real resting period required.  A little ground pepper and some sesame seeds are technically optional, but I wouldn’t skip them…they make a boring-sounding dough interesting and flavorful.

The instructions say to roll the dough as thin as possible.  When I make crackers, I like to roll them out on my pasta machine rather than with a wooden pin.  I did that here, too, and because the machine cranks out long, narrow, strips, I wound up cutting them into smaller pieces than the large, plate-sized matzos shown in the book’s photos.  The smaller pieces seemed also more easy to deal with using the kinda scary-sounding baking-and-flipping-on-a-blazing-hot-sheet-tray technique called for in the recipe.  I only burned myself once, so I’d call that a success!

I got matzos that were much more thin and delicate than the store-bought ones I’ve had.  And did I already mention how good the sesame seeds are in here?  I made a little smoked salmon, dill and cream cheese spread to go with the matzos, and the combo was every bit as addictive as chips and dip.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan (there’s also a video of the episode). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Limoncello Cupcakes

April 14, 2015 at 12:12 pm | Posted in BCM, cupcakes, groups, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 21 Comments
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limoncello cupcakes

Cupcakes…it’s been a while.  They don’t get the same love that they used to, but I still like them.  I especially like them when there’s booze involved, and here it’s limoncello, the sweet Italian after dinner drink.  This one was missing from my little digestivo collection, but now I have a bottle of limoncello hanging out in the freezer for whenever I might want it!

The cupcake batter is simple to make.  It gets it’s moisture from yogurt and oil, so there’s no pesky creaming involved and it comes together in a flash by hand.  There’s a little dollop of marmalade hidden in the center of each cupcake, but if you have some lemon curd, I bet it would be good, too.  As I was making the batter and scooping the cupcakes, I realized that it’s pretty much the same deal as another Dorie cake– her yogurt loaf cake with marmalade glaze— that I’ve made several times before, just tweaked into a different form and with a bit of limoncello added.  The cupcakes rose perfectly.  They had a nice dome and the yogurt/oil combo gave then a springy, moist texture.  They get brushed with a limoncello simple syrup while they’re still warm to boost that citrusy flavor.

What’s a cupcake without frosting, right?  Well, due to an unexpected powdered sugar shortage, I really only made frosting for the two in the picture.  The others we ate naked, with a scoop of vanilla ice cream and an extra drizzle of the limoncello syrup all over.  We actually liked them better that way, so if you don’t want to make frosting, they are great as-is…but I’d still recommend the syrup for a little extra spike of limoncello.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Sweet Ricotta Pie

April 7, 2015 at 10:50 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 6 Comments
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sweet ricotta pie

This Sweet Ricotta Pie from Nick Malgieri is the dessert version of his Pizza Rustica, which we made a few Easters ago.  It’s made with the same sweet, cookie-like pasta frolla dough and also has a ricotta-based filling.  Apart from the ricotta (and few eggs to bind), the filling is pretty simple and is just flavored with sugar, anisette and cinnamon.  I’m not wild about anisette, and thought the filling could use a little more pizzazz anyway, so I tweaked it a bit.  I had a small handful candied orange peel left from this year’s batch of Hot Cross Buns, so I soaked that, along with some golden raisins, in a good amount of Grand Marnier.  I kept the cinnamon, but stirred it into the filling along with the dried fruit (rather than sprinkling it in a layer on top).

This pie has good orange flavor, but the filling’s a little dry.  If I make this one again, I may try adding a few tablespoons of heavy cream to the batter or try swapping out a couple of the whole eggs for just yolks to see if that adds more moisture.  I like the pasta frolla dough, too, although I wish the lattice strips had gotten a little more color in the oven. Looking back, I see that with the Rustica, I eggwashed the lattice for some browning action…seems I always look back a little too late.

sweet ricotta pie

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

TWD BWJ Rewind: Pebble Bread

March 30, 2015 at 12:34 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 4 Comments
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pebble bread

A couple of weeks ago, the group made the Pebble Bread recipe from Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid, world travellers who have brought us a few other flatbreads you may or may not remember.  I was all geared up to make this one, and then I didn’t.  Sometimes I just run out of gas.  Thankfully we get a make-up week every now and again.

Pebble Bread is a round Moroccan flatbread; traditionally baked on hot pebbles, it gets dimply and a little puffed.  The not-so-traditional Western method we used here involves a bowl of water, your fingertips, and a heavy skillet…first dipping a rolled out dough round into water to create steam, next quickly dimpling it with your fingertips, then starting the bread in a skillet on the stovetop to cook the bottom, and finishing it under the broiler to cook the top. 

I only made half a recipe (four large-enough-to-share pieces of bread) and since I used two skillets and they take just a few minutes each to cook, I worked though the process pretty quickly.  Of course I totes torched the top of my first one under the broiler, but, just like my morning toast, it was nothing a little scrapey-scrape with a serrated knife couldn’t fix.  You learn, eat your mistake before anyone else sees it, adjust and keep going.

I’d call these a definite success.  I can’t roll pie dough into a nice round to save my life, but these breads all rolled out into perfect circles.  They had just enough puff and chew, and a good flavor from the overnight sponge (yes, you need to plan to make a sponge the day before you make the bread, but it’s virtually hands-off) and the barley flour in the dough.  I have a couple breads left in my freezer and I am very happy to eat all of them warm, ripped up and swiped first into olive oil and then into dukkah (which is actually an Egyptian nut and seed mix, but we found it all over the place when we lived in Australia, and ever since I must have it on a regular basis).

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll to see if anyone else did a rewind this week, and see the links page from the Pebble Bread a couple of weeks ago!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Crispy-Topped Brown Sugar Bars

March 24, 2015 at 5:44 pm | Posted in BCM, cookies & bars, groups, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 16 Comments
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crispy-topped brown sugar bars

Anyone remember the Snickery Squares from BFMHTY?  I think Crispy-Topped Brown Sugar Bars are BCM‘s answer to those.  Junky, but in the best possible way, these homemade candy bars have a brown sugar cookie base and a smear of dark chocolate.  The star of the show, though, is the layer of caramelized Rice Krispies on top.  You may be tempted to skip caramelizing the Krispies and just toss on a handful as-is outta the box, but it is a step that is worth it.  (A couple of people used caramel corn instead of Krispies, and that sounds pretty darn good, too.)  Also, you’ll wind up with extra caramel Krispies– score!  I shamefully admit that I considered eating those extra sugary puffs with milk for breakfast, but decided to save them for ice cream sundaes instead…far less shameful, right?

I heard that the brown sugar cookie base was very crisp and a bit of a mess to cut when baked at the recipe’s stated time and temp (375°F for 22 minutes), so I baked my base at 350°F for about 15 minutes instead.  It was easy to cut into bars and ate like a soft, chewy shortbread.  I did only make a half recipe in a loaf tin, but if I did a full size batch, I’d still definitely peek in the oven after 15 minutes and see what’s going on.

These bars sounded like they had the potential to be very sweet, so I used a 72% bittersweet chocolate with a tiny pinch of salt sprinkled in to keep it under control.  They are rich enough that I could say a little goes a long way, but really, they are moreish enough that I could have eaten the whole loaf pan in one go!

Make them!  For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

P.S.: If you’re interested in gluten-free baking, enter my Gluten-Free Flour Power book giveaway here.

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Lemon Madeleines

March 10, 2015 at 12:01 am | Posted in BCM, cakes & tortes, cookies & bars, groups, simple cakes, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 22 Comments
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lemon madeleines

By now, I’ve made several of Dorie’s madeleine recipes, but these Lemon Madeleines were the first to give me that coveted backside bump!  The trick, apparently, is to keep the batter super-cold until the second the shell-shaped pan hits the oven.  Hmmm…perhaps I should revisit one of the older recipes (chai was a favorite)?

I like madeleines, but I never really think of them until they roll around for TWD.  They’re easy enough to make…the batter is quickly whisked together by hand and it can even out in the fridge for a few days.  Madeleines are for sure best eaten fresh, so it’s handy to be able to bake them off as you want them (I did about four a day until the batter was gone).  These ones came out nice and spongy.  And lemony, of course, because of zest in the batter and juice in the glaze.

Madeleines often find themselves dunked into a cup of tea, but there was some lemon curd left from last week’s BWJ recipe, so we swiped them in that.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Not-Your-Usual Lemon Meringue Pie

March 3, 2015 at 6:01 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 24 Comments
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not-your-usual lemon meringue pie

I’ve done a pretty traditional LMP here before, so I guess it’s time to try out Gale Gand’s Not-Your-Usual Lemon Meringue Pie.  Forget about making pie crust for this– lemon curd and meringue are sandwiched Napoleon-style between layers of crispy sugared phyllo dough.  BTW, based on the previous Gale Gand stuff we’ve made, I was not at all surprised to see phyllo pop up here.

This is a pretty dessert and it’s pretty straightforward, too.  It does need to be served fairly soon after it’s stacked up, but you can make the lemon curd and bake the phyllo crisps plenty ahead of time.  Wait till the last minute to get the brown sugar Swiss meringue done, though.

We liked this “pie” a lot.  The pretty layers do smoosh as soon is they’re hit with a fork, but that’s okay.  The lemon curd is a gentle one…not too puckery.  The recipe left me with extra curd, which is no problem in my books, but I would recommend reducing the meringue amount by at least a couple of whites, if not by half.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here).  Here’s a video of the BWJ episode (this dessert is in the second half).  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll

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