Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Rustic Potato Loaves

April 2, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 17 Comments
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rustic potato loaf

I don’t make bread super-often. Only sometimes I’m usually proud of myself just for having made the effort to stir together yeast and water.  But when I opened the oven yesterday and pulled out Leslie Mackie’s Rustic Potato Loaf, I felt like a pretty legit bread baker.  Look at that crust…it is awesome. I was in love with this bread before I even cut it open.

You can’t see any trace of them, but the bread has mashed boiled potatoes in it.  I guess they help make the bread really soft inside and give it a slightly earthy flavor.  I wasn’t sure if I should peel the potatoes or not…in the end I did peel them, but also tossed the peel scraps into the cooking pot just to infuse some extra flavor into the water (which is also used in the dough).  The dough looked like a big blob of uncooked gnocchi but it was a quick riser, with two proofs of just 20-30 minutes.  So, for a “rustic” bread, it was pretty quick from start to finish.

rustic potato loaf

I’m making cream of celery soup tonight and toasting off a couple of slices of this bread, and I just can’t wait!  For the bread recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Dawn’s Simply Sweet.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Maple-Glazed Meatballs and a BOOK GIVEAWAY!

March 1, 2013 at 5:33 pm | Posted in book review, other savory, savory things | 29 Comments
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maple-galzed meatballs

As a kid, getting breakfast for dinner was a rare and exciting treat.  As an adult, I can do this any darn time I please, but it still hasn’t lost it’s excitement factor.  Clearly I’m not alone in this, because there’s a new book called Breakfast for Dinner by Lindsay Landis and Taylor Hackbarth.  This book has savory takes on pancakes and waffles, lots of egg dishes and even breakfast for dessert, but these Maple-Glazed Meatballs– like breakfast sausage doused in syrup– were what I wanted to try first.

These meatballs are flavorful and moist. Because of their sweetness, I wouldn’t pair these with pasta, but they make a great app or a perfect TV snack.

I want to send a copy of Breakfast for Dinner to one of you!  Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 4:00 pm EST on Friday, March 8 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list.  Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. It selected comment 18, so congratulations to AnnaZed. I’ll be sending your book soon!***

Maple-Glazed Meatballs- makes about 24 meatballs
from Breakfast for Dinner by Lindsay Landis and Taylor Hackbarth

Steph’s Note: The original recipe called for ground pork, but I used ground chicken instead.  If you do, too, you may find that you need to add extra tablespoon of so of breadcrumbs and give the mix about a 30 minute rest in the fridge before portioning into meatballs.

for the meatballs:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 medium yellow onion, diced
 1 small Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, finely diced (about 1 cup)
1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 pound ground pork (or ground chicken)
1 egg
1/2 cup unseasoned bread crumbs
1/4 cup milk
2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 teaspoon ground fennel
1/2 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

for the glaze:
2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
2 teaspoons tomato paste
1/2 cup apple juice
2 teaspoons cider vinegar

-Line a baking sheet with foil.

-Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat.  Add the onion.  Cook until translucent, 7 to 10 minutes.  Stir in apples, ginger and garlic.  Cook 1 to 2 minutes.  Remove from heat and cool.

-In a large bowl, combine pork, egg, breadcrumbs, milk, maple syrup, fennel, red pepper flakes, salt and black pepper.  Add the cooled onion mixture.  Mix with your hands until uniform. Roll by tablespoonfuls into 1-inch balls, or use a small ice cream scoop to portion.  Arrange on prepared sheet.  Refrigerate for 30 minutes.

-Preheat oven to 400°F.

-For the glaze, whisk together maple syrup, tomato paste, apple juice and vinegar in a small saucepan. Bring to a simmer. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until reduced by half, about 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from the heat and cool slightly.

-Brush meatballs with half of glaze. Bake 10 minutes. Brush with remaining glaze. Bake 5 to 7 minutes longer or until cooked through (internal temperature of 160°F. Serve warm.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books, sent me a copy of this book.
Breakfast for Dinner

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Focaccia

February 5, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 12 Comments
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focaccia

A warm pan of this stuff– this olive oil-soaked bread– is dangerous.  Craig Kominiak’s Focaccia is the type of thing I could polish off myself in one sitting. 

There was some talk about KitchenAid burnout from the full batch of dough, which made three breads.  In the interests of both self-restraint and my red KA, I did just a third of it.  No problems with the mixing, and only one pan of focaccia to tempt me.

Don’t make this dough in the morning and expect to have focaccia by dinner.  It needs a solid 24 hours to rest in the fridge (after two room temp rises) for flavor and air bubbles.  I was daydreaming about that pizza from a couple of weeks ago, and in the course of that downtime made a pan of caramelized onions to top my bread.

I think with focaccia, as with most things savory, the more olive oil the better.  Rather than sprinkle my baking sheet with cornmeal, I lubed it up with extra oil before stretching the dough into it.  Then I brushed garlic and thyme infused olive oil all over the top.  At the half-way point in baking, I scattered on my caramelized onions (so they wouldn’t burn), popped the focaccia out of the pan and slipped it directly onto my pizza stone to finish baking.  I had delicious oily, salty bread with an almost fried bottom crust.  If I had a criticism, it would be that slashing the dough, as the recipe calls, just before baking seemed to really deflate the air bubbles and inhibit its rise.  Next time, I’ll dimple the dough with my fingers instead and hopefully it will be puffy and tall.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Sharmini’s blog Wandering Through (a modified version is also here and there’s a video here). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Pizza with Onion Confit

January 8, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 19 Comments
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pizza with onion confit

My husband is going out for a business dinner tonight, and I have plans of my own.  Sometimes when he’s not around for dinner I’ll meet up with friends for wine and gossip. But tonight, it’s a little alone time…just me, Steve Sullivan’s Pizza with Onion Confit and the first episode of the new season of Downton Abbey.  Perfect

Here in Brooklyn I don’t have to look too hard to find good pizza, but I make it a lot at home anyway.  I fiddle around with different recipes, too, so I didn’t mind trying a new one here.  This dough uses a sponge starter to add flavor, but the process can be done in a day, unlike some doughs that require a day or two of fridge fermentation (like this excellent one).  I cook my pizzas on a stone in a ripping-hot oven.  And I (obviously) don’t care too much if they are perfectly round or not.

pizza with onion confitpizza with onion confit

All the tears you shed slicing onions will be worth it when you wind up with a pan full of soft, sweet onion confit to top your pizza.  I didn’t have the red wine the recipe calls to simmer the onions in, but I did have an open bottle of white, so I used that instead.  I’m sure the red wine would have made the confit a beautiful shade of rich purple, but mine wound up more like traditional caramelized onions.  Leftover onion confit is like gold in the fridge, and I can’t wait to use it on a turkey burger or a sandwich. 

onion confit

I also put a handful of spinach on top of my pizza, you know, for vegetables.  And at the halfway point I crumbled on a little Point Reyes blue cheese.  For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Paul’s The Boy Can Bake.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Bagels

October 16, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in breakfast things, groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 12 Comments
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bagels

I eat my fair share of bagels.  Frankly it’s hard not to when you live in New York City and there are bagel shops all over the place (Bergen Bagels being my favorite close-to-home joint).  I’m not just a bagel-eater, I’ve actually made a lot of bagels, too, at my first restaurant job where we’d get slammed with weekend brunch crowds who all seemed to want the smoked trout with quail egg and a mini bagel….so Lauren Groveman’s recipe wasn’t totally Greek (or should I say Yiddish?) to me.

There were a couple of things I did differently than the recipe, just out of old habits.  After boiling the bagels for about a minute on each side, I removed them from the water and placed them on a cooling rack set over a baking sheet.  I baked them on the rack as well, because it allows the oven heat to circulate underneath the bagels. I didn’t bother brushing them with the egg white glaze before baking.  They may not have been laquer-shiny, but they still browned very nicely and the toppings held in place.  Also, in the bagel dough, I used half sugar and half barley malt syrup for the sweetener, which Groveman did on the TV show, but did a little differently in the book (which calls for only sugar).

I wasn’t super-prepared in the toppings department, so I just went with poppy seeds on some and grey salt on others.  The salt ones were my favorite. I stirred some dill and chives into cream cheese to jazz up my schmear a bit.  These were chewy and had a nice crust….with a cup of coffee, these bagels made for a perfect New York breakfast.

bagels

If you’ve never had a super-fresh, warm bagel before, you can really make great ones at home, so give it a go!  You can make the dough the night before and it’s ready to shape and cook off the next morning.  For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Heather’s Bytes (it’s also here).  And there’s even a video of Julia and Lauren making bagels together.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Deviled Eggs for Jessica’s Bridal Shower

October 3, 2012 at 6:00 am | Posted in other savory, savory things | 14 Comments
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deviled eggs

I love a good party, and I’m so happy to have been invited to a virtual bridal shower for Jessica from My Baking Heart!  I’ve gotten to know Jessica through TWD.  She’s an amazing baker (and cook, too)…clearly C knows that he’s a lucky guy.

Nikki from Pennies on a Platter organized this big celebration, and we are going to have a fabulous table of drinks, snacks and sweets prepared by a list of incredible ladies.  I decided to bring along deviled eggs.  They are one of my favorite cocktail snacks, and I just love how retro they are.  The recipe below is for deviled eggs at their most basic, but you can jazz them up an infinite number of ways with spices and fresh herbs.  I used a French curry mayo that I bought at the fancy mayonnaise shop here in Brooklyn (I was just too intrigued by the strangeness of a mayonnaise shop not to stop in and buy something), and sprinkled over smoked paprika and chives.  Of course I piped my filling in with a star tip because it’s a special occasion.

Please visit Jessica to say congratulations and head over to Nikki’s to see the whole party spread.  Cheers to Jessica and Chris!

Deviled Eggs- makes 12 halves

6 large eggs
2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon sour cream
1/2 teaspoon white wine vinegar or squeeze of lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard
salt and pepper to taste

-Place eggs in medium saucepan, cover with 1 inch of water, and bring to boil over high heat.  Turn off the heat, cover and let stand 10-12 minutes. Meanwhile, fill a medium bowl with water and ice cubes. Transfer eggs to ice water with slotted spoon and let cool 5 minutes.

-Peel eggs and slice in half lengthwise. Put the yolks in a fine-mesh sieve and use a spatula to press them through sieve and into bowl. Add remaining ingredients, and stir vigorously until smooth.

-Arrange whites on serving platter and mound with the yolk mixture, either using a spoon or a pastry bag and tip.  Serve immediately.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Whole Wheat Loaves

September 18, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 14 Comments
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whole wheat loaves

Now that it’s ever so slightly cooler outside, it’s nice to spend the better part of a Sunday morning making bread.  Baking a yeast bread makes me feel productive, even if I’m really doing almost nothing at all.  Craig Kominiak’s Whole Wheat Loaves were this weekend’s TWD project.

This wheat bread has a kiss of honey and malt extract (I used the Eden Foods malt syrup).  It’s slightly sweet, soft and wholesome…not bland, dense and healthy (if you know what I mean).  It’s good for sandwiching and for toasting.  Now that I say that, it would no doubt make an awesome grilled cheese.  That’s avocado toast up top…one of my favorite toast applications…and a turkey sandwich down below.

whole wheat loaves

This is how wheat bread should be.  I’m glad that the recipe is so unintimidating…there’s no excuse for me to not make it often.  For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Michele’s Veggie Num Nums and Teresa’s The Family That Bakes Together.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Semolina Bread

July 17, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 17 Comments
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semolina bread

I thought I was in for a whole day project when I set out to make Nick Malgieri’s Semolina Bread.  The recipe calls for three two-hour proof periods, but with the East Coast heat and humidity, my kitchen is its own proof box.  I had that loaf ready for the oven in under five!

I made the dough in the food processor.  So easy.  I cut the salt by a quarter teaspoon, and added it to the dough after the rest period in the processor.  Besides that and my shorter proof times, I followed the recipe as-is.

I wanted my loaf to be like bread from the Italian bakeries over in Carroll Gardens, so I spritzed it with a little water and sprinkled on some sesame seeds before I put it  in the oven.  Then they all more of less fell off when I cut into it, but whatever.  I had a crusty, golden loaf of bread, and it was delicious.  My favorite part of a crusty loaf like this is the end bit.  Actually my favorite parts, since there are two end bits!  Slathered with a little salty butter, they are my ideal baker’s treat.

semolina bread

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Renee’s The Way to my Family’s Heart and Anna’s Keep it Luce.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Oasis Naan

June 5, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 32 Comments
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oasis naan

Phew…I cut it close on this one.  I just made Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid’s Oasis Naan a couple of hours ago.  Luckily it’s a pretty simple bread dough, as long as you have the time to proof it.

The recipe calls for making this flatbread dough by hand.  I’m lazy…I used the food processor, same as I do for pizza dough.  (I must say here, that I only made a half batch of dough, so everything fit just fine.)  I started by adding the minimum amount of flour to my processor bowl, then with the machine running, I poured in my water/yeast combo.  I added more flour to touch and turned off the machine for 10 minutes.  Then I sprinkled the salt and a little bit more flour over the dough (because it still felt pretty sticky) and turned it back on for a few more seconds.  I kneaded it on the counter for about a minute before putting into a bowl to proof.

The dough bakes up nice and puffy (be sure to dock it well!), and chewy, too.  I topped mine with chopped spring garlic and za’atar spice, but I bet all kinds of things would be good on top.  You could even make them like mini pizzas.  It’s not quite as soft and charred as the naan I get from my local Indian takeaway, but I’d make this again for sure.

We ate our naan with a freekeh, beet, chickpea and feta salad I concocted.  Very healty…I think my husband thought the naan was the best part!

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Maggie’s Always Add More Butter and Phyl of Of Cabbages & King Cakes.  There’s also a video of Alford, Duguid and Julia making the bread together, and the authors wrote this article that gives more naan tips.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Pizza Rustica

April 3, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie | 30 Comments
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pizza rustica

This week TWD is putting on our Easter best with Nick Malgieri ‘s Pizza Rustica.  If you are wondering “what heck kind of pizza is this?” then think instead of cheese pie.  Ricotta, mozzarella, pecorino…like calzone filling inside pie crust.  This is rich and special…no wonder it is an Italian Easter tradition.

The pie dough is a pasta frolla, which is actually a sweet dough, and is used in cookies as well.  A sweet dough may sound odd for a savory pie, but with the salty filling, it just works.  I should note though, that I cut back the sugar in the recipe from 1/3 cup to 3 tablespoons.  For me, this was just the right level of sweetness.  The dough also has some baking powder in it, so it puffs a bit and reminded me a little of a biscuit.  The pasta frolla is really easy to work with.  If you need to patch it while rolling it out, just press it back together.  For better browning, you can brush the lattice strips with a little eggwash before baking.

At the shop where I work, we make a pizza rustica almost every day.  The filling has prosciutto in it and I don’t eat pork, so in the year and a half I’ve been there, I’ve never had a taste!  I was really excited to make one at home that I could finally try.  This recipe also has prosciutto in the filling, but I think the substitution possibilities are pretty limitless here.  In mine, I went with chicken sausage and kale (both of which I cooked and cooled first), and some red pepper flakes for spice.  One thing that I’ve learned from making rustica at work is that it’s important to remove any excess liquid from the filling components before assembly.  The night before making my PR, I drained my ricotta in a sieve lined with a coffee filter.  I also was sure to squeeze any juice out of my cooked kale before chopping it up.

I think that pizza rustica is best eaten room temperature.  And you know what goes great with it?  Red wine.

pizza rustica

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Emily’s blog, Capitol Region Dining, and Raelynn’s blog, The Place They Call Home, as they are co-hosting this recipe.  Thanks, ladies!  There’s also a video of Nick and Julia making the pizza rustica together. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

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