Savory Cheddar and Scallion Waffles

March 30, 2012 at 2:28 pm | Posted in breakfast things, pancakes & waffles, savory things | 9 Comments
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savory cheddar and scallion waffles

Usually I don’t work on Fridays.  Typically I have the day to myself.  Sometimes I do errands or shopping.  Occasionally I can find a friend to escape work and have lunch with me.  Always I eat breakfast and watch episodes of House Hunters.

Breakfast du jour was a Savory Cheddar and Scallion waffle topped with salsa, sour cream and an egg.  I treat myself right, don’t I?  Actually I just pulled the waffle out of the freezer and reheated it.  It was leftover from a “breakfast for dinner” night earlier in the week. That’s the beauty of a savory waffle…perfect for brekkie or dinner.  It’s not weird, trust me. This one has a bit of a Southwestern twist to it– some cornmeal, scallions, cheddar, cilantro and hot sauce (I use a heavy hand with the Crystal).  I was worried that the cheese might adhere to the waffle iron and act like superglue…it didn’t.  I had beautifully formed, crisp-edged waffles with buttermilk tang and a savory flavor.

I’m trying to use my waffle iron more often.  After I get past the annoyance of removing it from its styrofoam and box (yes, OK, I am an original packaging hoarder), making waffles is really fun.  And eating them, even more.

savory cheddar and scallion waffles

Savory Cheddar and Scallion Waffles- serves 2-4 (this made four big waffles in my iron)
adapted from Eating for England (who adapted it from Joy the Baker and Williams Sonoma)

1 1/4 c all-purpose flour
1/4 c cornmeal (coarse, if you have it)
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1 tsp granulated sugar
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
2 large eggs
2 tbsp vegetable oil
couple dashes of hot sauce, to taste
1 1/4 c buttermilk
1/2 c finely grated cheddar cheese
1 chopped scallion, white and green parts
2 tbsp chopped cilantro

-Heat your oven to 200°F and heat your waffle iron, according to the manufacturer’s instructions.  Grease it with a little vegetable oil if it needs it.

-In a large bowl, whisk together flour, cornmeal, baking powder, baking soda, black pepper, sugar and salt.

-In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, oil, hot sauce and buttermilk.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients, then add the cheese, scallions and cilantro. Stir until just incorporated. Try not to over-mix the batter.

-Cook according to your waffle machine instructions.  Hold the finished waffles in the warm oven while you make the rest.

-Garnish as you wish (for me, it was salsa, sour cream, an egg and some extra cilantro) and serve immediately.  If you have extra waffles, wrap them well and freeze them…they can be recrisped in the toaster or oven.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Irish Soda Bread

March 20, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, quick breads, savory things, tuesdays with dorie | 35 Comments
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Irish soda bread

We may represent six different continents, but this week we’re all Irish in TWD with Marion Cunningham’s Irish Soda Bread.  I like Marion Cunningham.  I think she seems like a cool lady, and I have a few of her books (the most well-used is The Breakfast Book).  But I digress…

I knew that I wanted to have this bread with butter and marmalade on St. Patrick’s Day morning, but I didn’t know how I was going to pull it off for breakfast when it takes almost an hour to bake and then more time to cool.  I was worried about making it in advance, because in the book, the recipe intro says it turns “as hard as the Blarney Stone” (which I have kissed, btw) after a few hours.  Then I watched the video of Marion and Julia making the bread together…Marion whips out an already-made loaf and clearly says that it had been baked the night before, left to cool completely and then wrapped.  So that’s what I did…I made it the night before and it was still perfect the next morning.

This recipe has just four ingredients (flour, baking soda, salt and buttermilk), and the dough is simply stirred together…it’s almost amazing that it turns into bread!  I had actually wanted to sneak some currants in my loaf, too, but then I completely forgot about them until the second after I’d scraped the sticky dough into the pie plate.  I wasn’t going to mess with it anymore at the point.  No matter– the bread had plenty of flavor…a little salty and a little tangy.  Like most Irish people I know, my loaf also had plenty of character….I probably could have kneaded a bit more flour into it to make it a smoother round, but I liked its quirkiness just fine.

Irish soda bread

Don’t wait until next March to make this….it’s so easy and good that it’s perfect anytime.  For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here in somewhat condensed form) or read Carla’s blog Chocolate Moosey, and Cathleen’s blog My Culinary Mission, as they are co-hosting this recipe.  Thanks, ladies!  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: White Loaves

February 7, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 37 Comments
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white loaves

Here we go…the next round of Tuesdays with Dorie starts today, and this time we’re Baking with Julia!  I’ve had this book for years, and have made several things from it, so I’m looking forward to getting to know it better.  And also to getting to know a new group of TWDers!

First up, we’re doing Craig Kominiak’s White Loaves.  I’m really excited about the bread section of the book, so I was pleased to tackle this one at the get-go.  This is your basic sandwich loaf, perfect for PB&J, as you can see above.  It wasn’t hard to make.  I halved the recipe to do one loaf instead of two, and my mixer had no problem getting the dough together quickly (the full two loaves probably would have made it whine).  A couple of rises later, and the dough was ready to become bread!  Seriously, the hardest part here was waiting for my loaf to cool so I could get my lunch together (it’s always important to let bread like this cool properly or the texture won’t be right).  I loved the crust on this…a nice crispy top.  And the bread was so soft inside.  I have half the loaf stashed in the freezer, and am looking forward to a turkey and cheese sandwich next.

white loaves

Homemade yeast bread smells so good in the oven.  You won’t get that from a store-bought loaf, so for the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read our founder Laurie’s blog, slush, and our group manager Julie’s blog, Someone’s in the Kitchen, as they are co-hosting the first recipe.  Thanks, ladies!  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Capers and Lemony Browned Butter

November 22, 2011 at 6:46 pm | Posted in savory things, veggies | 4 Comments
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roasted Brussels sprouts with capers and lemony browned butter

I was never the kid who picked her Brussels sprouts off the plate and threw them across the room.  Nope, I’ve always liked them (bite-sized cabbages are cool!), and since in my house they’re not just a once-a-year neglected side dish, I’m always on the hunt for fun ways to fix them.  Roasting is one of my favorite techniques to prepare sprouts…mostly because you can just toss them in the oven and basically leave them be while you focus on other things, but also because you get a combo of tender spouts and crunchy stray leaves.  A new book that I’ve really been enjoying called All About Roasting: A New Approach to a Classic Art by Molly Stevens shows a new twist on roasted sprouts by tossing them in a dressing of brown butter, lemon juice and capers.  I’ve apparently been on a brown butter kick lately, but it really does add a nutty flavor that makes things extra-special.  The lemon juice and capers add a bright acidic pop to the little-bitty cabbages.  I gave this recipe a trial run a couple of weeks ago, and liked it so much that I’m making it again for Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday.

Happy Thanksgiving!  And no pie until you finish your sprouts!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Capers and Lemony Browned Butter– makes four servings
adapted from All About Roasting: A New Approach to a Classic Art by Molly Stevens

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon mustard seeds, yellow or brown
2 tablespoons capers, drained
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice, plus more if needed

- Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat to 425 degrees (400 degrees convection). If desired, line a heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

- Depending on their size, cut the Brussels sprouts in halves or quarters; you want them to be small enough to be bite-sized. Place in a large bowl and toss with the olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. Arrange the sprouts in a single layer on the baking sheet. Don’t worry if some of the leaves fall off. Include these when roasting; they will crisp up, adding a nice crunch to the dish.

- Slide the Brussels sprouts into the oven and roast, turning once or twice with a metal spatula to promote even cooking, until the sprouts are tender throughout and smaller bits or leaves that have fallen off are browned and crunchy, 20 to 25 minutes. Test for doneness by piercing a sprout with the tip of a paring knife, but to be sure, nab one off the baking sheet, let it cool slightly, and taste; it should be tender and sweet.

- As the sprouts roast, melt the butter in a small skillet or heavy saucepan (it should be no more than 6 inches across or the butter will burn). Cook over medium heat until the butter is melted. Add the mustard seeds, increase the heat to medium-high, and cook, watching the pan carefully and swirling frequently, until the butter begins to foam and turns golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add the capers and lemon juice — the butter will sizzle — and immediately remove from the heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste and keep warm until the Brussels sprouts are ready.

- Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a serving dish and add the browned butter. Toss to coat. Taste for salt, pepper, and lemon and serve immediately.

Please note that the publisher, W.W. Norton, sent me a copy of this book.

Quick Bread and Butter Pickles

July 22, 2011 at 1:42 pm | Posted in pickles, savory things | 4 Comments
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quick bread and butter pickles

After a bit of cutthroat competition involving a waitlist and a rush to a sign-up event to snag one of fifteen spots off said waitlist (oh New York, why must everything be so difficult?), I managed to secure a spot in a local CSA for the season.  One of my favorite things about being in a CSA is also its big challenge…having to think quickly so that the surprise assortment of perishables you are presented with doesn’t do just that.  I am determined not to toss anything into the bin, so I have to get a little creative sometimes.  There have been some interesting slaws (a kohlrabi one, in particular, was a stand-out) and a lot of grain and veggie salads. Pickling is another great way to use vegetables, especially because the ten minutes you spend to prep your pickles gives you snacks that last for weeks.  They are the gift that keeps on giving, so to speak.

When I came home from my CSA pick-up a couple of weeks ago with a sack of Kirby cucumbers, I knew immediately that I wanted to make bread and butter pickles.  For just a couple of bucks, I knew I could make sandwich pickles just as tasty as those $10 jars of Brooklyn hipster-made ones that all the gourmet shops around here sell.  Quick, refrigerator-style pickles are my thing.  I’m just making a jar at a time anyway, so there’s no need for me to get into canning for really-long-term storage.  These are extremely easy to make.  Not only do you get zingy, crunchy pickled cukes, but also onions(!), which are equally tasty on sandwiches.  The recipe says you can keep them for two weeks, but I’m betting that in their vinegary brine, they’ll keep for up to a month in the fridge.

*Have beets?  Try these Raw Pickled Beets.*

Quick Bread and Butter Pickles- makes one large jar
modified from Cooks Illustrated (July 2007)

Steph’s Note: The original recipe calls for 3/4 cup sugar, but I reduced it to 1/2 cup (after my experience making some too-sweet pickles out of another veggie a few weeks ago).  Use the amount you think would suit your tastes.

1 pound pickling (Kirby) cucumbers , sliced crosswise into 1/8-inch disks
1 medium onion, halved and sliced thin
1 tablespoon kosher or pickling salt
1 cup cider vinegar
1/2 – 3/4 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
1/4 teaspoon celery seeds
1/4 teaspoon corriander seeds
1/8 teaspoon ground tumeric

-Toss cucumbers, onion, and salt in colander set over bowl.  Let stand 1 hour.  Discard any liquid collected in the bowl.

-Bring vinegar, sugar, mustard seeds, celery seeds, corriander seeds and turmeric to boil in large saucepan.  Reduce heat to low, add cucumbers and onion, and press to submerge in liquid.  Cover and cook until cucumbers turn dullish olive-brown, about 5 minutes.

-Transfer entire pan contents to glass bowl. Refrigerate, uncovered, at least 2 hours before serving.  Pickles can be refrigerated in a clean jar or covered container for 2 weeks.

French Fridays with Dorie: Mustard Bâtons

April 22, 2011 at 8:13 pm | Posted in french fridays with dorie, groups, other savory, savory things | 12 Comments
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mustard bâtons

If you are looking for one of the easiest hors d’oeuvres ever, then look no further than Mustard Bâtons.  Not only are they dead easy, they’re dead tasty, too.  Take some ready-made puff-pastry, smear it with strong Dijon mustard and fold it over to encase the mustard.  Then cut it into strips, eggwash and sprinkle with seeds or salt or pepper or whatever and bake until golden, crispy and flaky.  Voilà!  Enjoy with a glass of wine.

For the recipe, see Around my French Table by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here on Dorie’s site).  Don’t forget to check out my fellow francophiles’ posts!

French Fridays with Dorie: Savory Cheese and Scallion Bread

March 4, 2011 at 6:54 pm | Posted in french fridays with dorie, groups, quick breads, savory things | 19 Comments
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savory cheese and scallion bread

Cheese bread!  cheesy bread!  I went nuts when I saw this recipe was coming up for FFWD.  Who the heck wouldn’t want to eat cheesy, onioney (is that a word?) homemade bread?  I wanted to eat it so much that I made a whole big loaf, instead of a mini or half-loaf.  We had some the day it was baked with homemade tomato soup– so good!– and some went into the freezer, because it will be awesome alongside scrambled eggs for a weekend breakfast.

If you shy away from making bread at home, or fear yeast, or whatever, don’t worry here.  This is a quick bread, much like a muffin.  In fact, you can even turn the loaf into cheese muffins, if you are so inclined.  The original recipe uses chives, but I didn’t have any and used scallions instead.  A combo of cheddar and Gruyère was just right, and made this a great, easy, cheesy bread that I’ll bake again and again.

For the recipe, see Around my French Table by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also on The Washington Post’s site).  Don’t forget to check out my fellow francophiles’ posts!

French Fridays with Dorie: Sweet and Spicy Cocktail Nuts

December 31, 2010 at 3:51 pm | Posted in french fridays with dorie, groups, other savory, savory things | 8 Comments

sweet and spicy cocktail nuts

OK, I know it is New Year’s Eve afternoon already, and maybe I’ve missed the boat on telling you about this….but if you happen to be ringing in 2011 by having people over for cocktails, or if you are going to someone else’s place and looking for something to bring, I have just the thing.  Dorie’s Sweet and Spicy Cocktail Nuts are fast and easy (provided you have a stash of nuts in your fridge or cupboard), and trust me, they will be gobbled up.

The technique is simple:  take a couple cups of your favorite nuts (a mix is best), coat them lightly in a frothed-up egg white and then toss them in a mix of sugar, salt and spices.  Bake for half an hour at 300°, making sure they are in a single layer so they don’t stick together.  Let cool and enjoy with wine or bubbly.

For the exact recipe, see Around my French Table by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out my fellow francophiles’ posts (not all of us are doing the recipe this week).   Happy 2011, and I’ll see you next year!

French Fridays with Dorie: Pumpkin-Gorgonzola Flans

November 12, 2010 at 6:23 pm | Posted in french fridays with dorie, groups, other savory, savory things | 9 Comments

pumpkin-gorgonzola flan

This French Fridays with Dorie recipe isn’t a dessert flan with caramel, but a savory custard with blue cheese and walnuts.  The pumpkin flan base comes together in snap thanks to canned pumpkin and the food processor.  I think I was a little aggressive with the whizzing up…my flans looked like I had some tiny air bubbles trapped below the surface.  No matter, they still tasted great, and baking them in a water bath ensured a creamy, soft texture.  I know I usually think of pie when I think of pumpkin, but really, it’s just squash and goes wonderfully with cheese and nuts.  Add a spinach salad, a piece of baguette and maybe a glass of wine, and you have dinner!

For the recipe, see Around my French Table by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out my fellow francophiles’ posts (not all of us are doing flan this week)!

Spiced Squash, Fennel and Pear Soup for a Celebration!

October 24, 2010 at 12:14 am | Posted in french fridays with dorie, groups, other stuff, savory things, soups | 20 Comments

spiced squash, fennel & pear soup

Today is a special day for one of my favorite cookbook authors…it’s Dorie Greenspan’s birthday!  Happy birthday, Dorie!  A few TWDers and FFWDers have put together a sort of virtual progressive dinner party, all made from Dorie’s new book, Around my French Table, to celebrate.

I chose to take on a soup course, and made her Spiced Squash, Fennel and Pear SoupI’m no stranger to squash soup, and usually I’ll use a butternut, but a crazy lumpy, bumpy golden hubbard caught my eye at the market and wound up coming home with me.  I’ve never made squash soup with the additions of pear and fennel before…they brought a delicious sweetness to the pot.  Don’t forget to toast up your squash seeds as garnish.  This is a great, warming soup that gets even more flavorful the next day.

For the recipe for this delicious soup, see page 80 of Around my French Table by Dorie Greenspan.  Holly from Phe.MOM.enon worked hard to coordinate this party, and will have the whole round-up on her site!

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