Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Semolina Bread

July 17, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 17 Comments
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semolina bread

I thought I was in for a whole day project when I set out to make Nick Malgieri’s Semolina Bread.  The recipe calls for three two-hour proof periods, but with the East Coast heat and humidity, my kitchen is its own proof box.  I had that loaf ready for the oven in under five!

I made the dough in the food processor.  So easy.  I cut the salt by a quarter teaspoon, and added it to the dough after the rest period in the processor.  Besides that and my shorter proof times, I followed the recipe as-is.

I wanted my loaf to be like bread from the Italian bakeries over in Carroll Gardens, so I spritzed it with a little water and sprinkled on some sesame seeds before I put it  in the oven.  Then they all more of less fell off when I cut into it, but whatever.  I had a crusty, golden loaf of bread, and it was delicious.  My favorite part of a crusty loaf like this is the end bit.  Actually my favorite parts, since there are two end bits!  Slathered with a little salty butter, they are my ideal baker’s treat.

semolina bread

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Renee’s The Way to my Family’s Heart and Anna’s Keep it Luce.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Oasis Naan

June 5, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 32 Comments
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oasis naan

Phew…I cut it close on this one.  I just made Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid’s Oasis Naan a couple of hours ago.  Luckily it’s a pretty simple bread dough, as long as you have the time to proof it.

The recipe calls for making this flatbread dough by hand.  I’m lazy…I used the food processor, same as I do for pizza dough.  (I must say here, that I only made a half batch of dough, so everything fit just fine.)  I started by adding the minimum amount of flour to my processor bowl, then with the machine running, I poured in my water/yeast combo.  I added more flour to touch and turned off the machine for 10 minutes.  Then I sprinkled the salt and a little bit more flour over the dough (because it still felt pretty sticky) and turned it back on for a few more seconds.  I kneaded it on the counter for about a minute before putting into a bowl to proof.

The dough bakes up nice and puffy (be sure to dock it well!), and chewy, too.  I topped mine with chopped spring garlic and za’atar spice, but I bet all kinds of things would be good on top.  You could even make them like mini pizzas.  It’s not quite as soft and charred as the naan I get from my local Indian takeaway, but I’d make this again for sure.

We ate our naan with a freekeh, beet, chickpea and feta salad I concocted.  Very healty…I think my husband thought the naan was the best part!

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Maggie’s Always Add More Butter and Phyl of Of Cabbages & King Cakes.  There’s also a video of Alford, Duguid and Julia making the bread together, and the authors wrote this article that gives more naan tips.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: White Loaves

February 7, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 37 Comments
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white loaves

Here we go…the next round of Tuesdays with Dorie starts today, and this time we’re Baking with Julia!  I’ve had this book for years, and have made several things from it, so I’m looking forward to getting to know it better.  And also to getting to know a new group of TWDers!

First up, we’re doing Craig Kominiak’s White Loaves.  I’m really excited about the bread section of the book, so I was pleased to tackle this one at the get-go.  This is your basic sandwich loaf, perfect for PB&J, as you can see above.  It wasn’t hard to make.  I halved the recipe to do one loaf instead of two, and my mixer had no problem getting the dough together quickly (the full two loaves probably would have made it whine).  A couple of rises later, and the dough was ready to become bread!  Seriously, the hardest part here was waiting for my loaf to cool so I could get my lunch together (it’s always important to let bread like this cool properly or the texture won’t be right).  I loved the crust on this…a nice crispy top.  And the bread was so soft inside.  I have half the loaf stashed in the freezer, and am looking forward to a turkey and cheese sandwich next.

white loaves

Homemade yeast bread smells so good in the oven.  You won’t get that from a store-bought loaf, so for the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read our founder Laurie’s blog, slush, and our group manager Julie’s blog, Someone’s in the Kitchen, as they are co-hosting the first recipe.  Thanks, ladies!  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Daring Bakers in October: Pizza & Toppings

October 29, 2008 at 4:12 am | Posted in daring bakers, groups, savory things, yeast breads | 39 Comments

pizza with potatoes, rosemary and maldon salt

October’s Daring Bakers’ Challenge is hosted by Rosa of Rosa’s Yummy Yums, and it’s the third recipe the group has made from The Bread Baker’s Apprentice: Mastering The Art of Extraordinary Bread by Peter Reinhart.  Judging from the other two, we will all have had spectacular results with this month’s PIZZA!  I completed the recipe so early in the month (which is quite unusual for me), that I’ve actually had too long to think about what I’d say.  In my head, this became quite a long, rambling post…sorry…I understand if you don’t have the patience!

I don’t know anyone who doesn’t like pizza.  I do have a couple of good friends who don’t eat cheese, but they still love cheese-less pizza.  As a New Yorker, I prefer pizza that has a chewy, puffy, nicely browned and slightly salty outer crust.  I think the crusty edge part is just as good as the topping part– you’ll never see me leaving a heap of chewed-around crusts on my plate!  I had a bit of a hard time with pizza in Sydney, where the preference seems to be an ultra-thin crust, with really no outer edge to speak of.  Eventually, we found Pizza Mario in Surry Hills (it’s an accredited member of  l’Associazione Verace Pizza Napoletana), which gets my vote as Sydney’s best!

I make pizza often at home, but I’ve had mixed results.  My best work came out of the oven in my last apartment in Brooklyn.  It was an old gas Magic Chef with a bottom heating element (I could see the flames under the oven floor) that got my stone ripping hot.  The bottom crust was always brown and crisp.  In Sydney, we had electric ovens with top heating elements in all three apartments, and no matter how long I preheated my stone, or where I placed it in the oven, I could never get the bottom to brown nicely.  It became quite frustrating, and I tried many dough recipes and little technique modifications along the way.  (It may also be the stone itself, as my old one went into storage accidentally and I had to get a different one in Sydney.  I’ve read about making pizza on the bottom side of a super-hot cast iron skillet under the broiler…sounds promising, but my skillet is kind of small.)  I’m definitely crossing my fingers for a gas oven in the future!

I made half a recipe of dough, from which I formed two largish pizzas.  This is a well-hydrated dough, and requires an overnight rest in the fridge.  I can be held for up to three days, though, so I decided to make one pizza for dinner one night, and the other the next night.  I know that Rosa wanted us to shape the dough by tossing it “like a real pizzaiolo,” but mine was much too sticky.  I had a hard time even with just the hand-stretching.  Despite the stickiness, the dough had a wonderful, soft feel, and I could tell by touch that the recipe would be a good one.

pizza with caramelized onions and gorgonzola

As far as pizza toppings go, I am a minimalist…I don’t like too many different things, or too much of any one thing, either, to weigh down or sog out the crust.  I usually do tomato sauce, mozzarella and basil– black olives, too, if I’m feeling crazy– so I thought I’d try a couple of “unusual” topping combinations for my challenge.  Inspired by a favorite at the aforementioned Pizza Mario, I made a pizza topped with potato, rosemary and Maldon salt with the first night’s dough.  Before baking, I simply sliced a red-skinned potato super-thin with a Japanese mandolin, spiraled the slices on the dough, sprinkled on the rosemary and salt, and drizzled olive oil all over it.  The next night, I slowly caramelized a sliced onion in a little olive oil and butter to top my second pizza.  Then I scattered on bits of gorgonzola picante and some more rosemary.

I just realized, looking back at the DB details to type up this post, that we were supposed to use both toppings and sauce.  Well, we can just consider olive oil to be the sauce on these, because I used copious amounts of the stuff on both pizzas!

pizza with potatoes, rosemary and maldon salt

The pizzas were a hit!  Potato pizza may sound like starch on starch, but it’s really so delicious.  If you’ve never tried it, I recommend giving it a go sometime.  The sweet onions with the sharp gorgonzola was a perfectly balanced match on the second pizza (and, in the oven, some of the onions got a little crispy on the edges– the best part!).  And the dough was wonderful– just the kind of bready crust I like!  I unfortunately had the same problems browning the underside, but I expected that, and I’ll try it again when I’m settled in New York.

Rosa was originally to host this challenge with Sher from What Did You Eat?, and it was Sherry’s idea to make this recipe.  Sherry passed away in July, but Rosa decided to go ahead with her choice, honoring her friend and her accomplishments as a cook and baker.  So don’t call for pizza delivery this weekend!  Make your own instead, and get the recipe on Rosa’s site.  Don’t forget to check out the DB blogroll

DB whisk

Daring Bakers in September: Lavash Crackers & Toppings

September 27, 2008 at 6:42 am | Posted in daring bakers, groups, savory things, yeast breads | 51 Comments

seedy lavash

This month we had our first “Alternative” Daring Bakers’ Challenge!  Natalie from Gluten A Go Go and Shel of Musings From the Fishbowl teamed up to bring us a two-part challenge.  The first part involved making homemade lavash.  Lavash are thin Armenian-style crackers.  They are very popular here in Australia, and packets go for big bucks in the gourmet stores.  Funny how easy it is to make them yourself!  Lavash are great with cheese, but the second part of this challenge was to concoct a vegan and gluten-free spread or dip to go with them.

Lavash dough is a simple yeasted dough, rolled out thin and often sprinkled with a seedy topping.  We were allowed to flavor the dough itself if we so desired, so I subbed a couple of tablespoons of the bread flour for wheat germ.  This gave the baked crackers a subtle, almost Wheat Thins-like flavor.  I made a full batch of the dough and divided it into two pieces–one to use straight away, and one to park overnight in the fridge.  I used different toppings and made a different spread for each. 

When it came time to roll the dough, I busted out my pasta machine (for the first time since moving to Sydney, so I was glad to actually have used it and justified its move).  I’ve made some form of cracker in every restaurant I’ve worked in, and have always used a pasta machine to roll them out.  It makes such quick work of it and is the easiest, least frustrating way to get your crakcers paper thin.  Use the lasagna sheet section, work with one bit of dough at a time, and take it down to the thinnest setting.

For my first batch of cracker, I rolled out long, wide pieces that I sprinkled with black and white sesame seeds, cumin seeds, cayenne pepper and Kosher salt before baking (brushing on a little water first acts as glue for the topping).  I simply broke these big pieces into more manageable shards after baking.  I served them with a chunky avocado relish with heaps of cilantro, lemon juice and spices.

seedy lavash with chunky avocado spread

For my second batch of cracker, I got a bit more fussy.  Instead of just baking off big pieces in whatever form they took when rolled, I used a pastry wheel to cut them into rectangular crackers.  I sprinkled them with poppy seeds and Maldon salt.  I had a huge bag of fava beans (a.k.a broad beans) from the farmers’ market, so I took about half of them and whizzed them into a dip for this batch of lavash.

poppy seed lavash with fava bean dip

I was really pleased with challenge!  The lavash and dips made perfect pre-dinner snacks (with a glass of wine, not too shabby!).  And how impressed would your friends be if you served them homemade crackers at a dinner party?

Check out the DB blogroll!  And visit Gluten A Go Go or Musings From the Fishbowl for the lavash recipe (which was adapted from The Bread Baker’s Apprentice: Mastering The Art of Extraordinary Bread by Peter Reinhart).  I made my two spreads pretty much freehand, but the basic procedures are below.

Chunky Avocado Relish

1 avocado
leafy green herb (such as basil or cilantro)
juice of half a lemon
olive or avocado oil
ground spices to taste (I used garam masala, cayenne, and cumin)
salt and black pepper to taste

-Scoop out the avocado and dice into chunks.  Chop your herb.  In a small bowl, make a dressing from the lemon juice, a slight splash of oil, the spices and salt and pepper.  Add the avocado and herb to the bowl and toss gently to mix.

Fava Bean Dip

1 1/2 cups fava beans, shelled from the outer pod
1 clove of garlic
leafy green herb (such as basil, parsley or cilantro)
squirt of lemon juice
olive oil
salt and black pepper to taste

-Bring a medium pot of water to the boil.  Blanch the fava beans for about thirty seconds, remove with a slotted spoon and shock in ice water.  Pop the garlic clove, peeled or unpeeled, into the boiling water and blanch for about 1 minute (this just helps take the edge off the raw garlic). 

-Pop the papery outer skins off the blanched fava beans and discard.  Peel the garlic clove if you haven’t already, and rough chop.

-Put the fava beans, garlic, lemon juice, herbs, splash of olive oil, salt and pepper into a mini food processor.  Pulse until it’s the consistency you like (you can use a couple tablespoons of water to thin out, if needed).  Taste for seasoning.

 DB whisk

Good News and Classic Sandwich Bread

May 15, 2008 at 5:44 pm | Posted in savory things, yeast breads | 23 Comments

classic sandwich bread

I woke up this morning to some good news: my Rhubarb-Filled Yogurt Cupcakes won Cupcake Hero’s Earth Day event!  I’m so excited, and not to brag (hahaha), but it’s actually my second CH win!  Thanks so much to Laurie, Tempered Woman, Joy and Leigh, who collect, bake and round-up the CH entries each month.  That takes not only heaps of ingredients, but lots of time, effort and witty paraphrasing skills as well.  Definitely check out the round-up to see all the Earth loving cupcakes they received last month.

Now, onto the bread.  I have some bread baking experience, but it’s pretty limited.  I’ve made zillions of batches of brioche, bagels and English muffins through my various jobs, and I make my own pizza dough all the time at home, but I never bake my own baguettes or dinner rolls, and I rarely even make a simple loaf bread.

What brought this on then?  Laziness may sound like a weird reason to bake your own bread, but that’s what it was, pure and simple.  I was too lazy to walk the 25 minutes down to the grocery store (I don’t drive).  R has been in Malaysia on business the last couple days. If I were in New York and R was away, I’d likely use that freedom to go and get bombed with my single friends if it weren’t a work night (you can keep that on the down-low), or at least order some yummy delivery if it were.  Since I don’t know too many people in Sydney to go boozing with, and there aren’t really any delivery options where I live, it was a tuna sandwich and the company of Tim Gunn’s Guide to Style for me last night.  I can’t manage a whole can of tuna myself, so I still had half my salad to eat for lunch today.  But…you guessed it…no bread.

Being lazy today, I’m lucky that making this type of bread is so freakin’ easy.  I had originally wanted to use a recipe from Rose Levy Beranbaum, but it required making a sponge starter and then it needed three rises for the dough.  While it would have had great flavor, it also wouldn’t have been ready by lunch-time, and that was the whole reason for getting the yeast out!  Then I remembered a recipe that I’d torn off a bag of King Arthur flour a couple years ago.  It only takes about two hours of total rising time, and if you use a stand mixer, measuring out the ingredients is really the only work there is.  It’s baked in a loaf pan, so there isn’t even any tricky shaping to do.  And I don’t know if it was because the bread was so fresh and soft, or if it was because I was so antsy after waiting for it to cool down, but that was one tasty tuna sandwich!

In true lazy fashion, I’ll just show you the way to King Arthur’s recipe, rather than type it myself.  I made mine in my stand mixer, using the dough hook.  I know that King Arthur’s AP flour has a higher protein content than most.  Since I can’t kind KA flour in this neck of the woods and I have no clue as to the protein content of the flour I buy here, I substituted 1/4 cup of the AP flour in the recipe with bread flour.  I substituted another 1/4 cup with whole wheat flour, just for fun.  Be sure take your baked bread out of the loaf pan and cool it on a rack for about an hour before slicing into it.  This rest period helps set the bread’s texture and crust.

Daring Bakers in November: Tender Potato Bread

November 26, 2007 at 12:00 pm | Posted in daring bakers, events, savory things, yeast breads | 60 Comments

potato bread

Ahhh…finally, today is the day when I can reveal my experience with the latest Daring Bakers challenge– it is something I really look forward to every month.  This go-around Tanna from My Kitchen in Half Cups had us roll up our sleeves and bake bread!  She chose a recipe for tender potato bread from Home Baking: The Artful Mix of Flour & Tradition Around the World by Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid.  This is a book I have on my own shelf, so I was extra-excited to give the bread recipe a try.

Besides being true to the base recipe, we had to knead the bread by hand (I hadn’t done that in forever!) and it had to be savory.  But other than that, Tanna really encouraged us to play around with the shape of our bread and the flavorings used.  I did cut the recipe in half, which is my usual MO, because R and I can’t (or shouldn’t) eat sooo much bread.  I used the maximum amount of mashed potato suggested by Tanna (16 ounces for a full recipe, or 8 ounces for my half recipe), and I can say that kneading the dough was definitely a sticky process.   But it wasn’t impossible on a well-floured surface…as the additional flour was worked in, I could feel the dough gaining structure and becoming easier to handle.

potato bread--focaccia

I split my dough into one small loaf and one small focaccia.  I kneaded some grated aged cheddar and cracked pepper into the loaf portion just before placing in the pan for its second proof.  The cheese bread was soft and had great flavor.  I still have half the loaf in my freezer, just waiting to be eaten with a bowl of soup.  The dough made for a fantastic focaccia as well– I put olive oil, olives, rosemary and Maldon salt on mine.  It had a nice, crisp bottom crust from baking it on a ripping-hot pizza stone.

Thanks Tanna for giving us a good break from the sweet stuff.  If you are afraid of yeast, don’t be– bread-baking is a truly satisfying experience!   You won’t believe how delicious warm homemade bread is!  If you want the recipe for the basic potato bread, look here on Tanna’s site.

potato bread--cheese 

And before I go, I’d like to wish a very happy birthday to Daring Bakers!  This not so-little-anymore group turned one this month.  Started by Lis and Ivonne, just two buddies wanting to make their own pretzels, the group is now more than 300 strong!  To see how we all interpreted this month’s potato bread challenge, take a look at The Daring Bakers’ Blogroll.

DB whisk

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