Dahlia Triple Coconut Cream Pie

February 8, 2014 at 2:35 pm | Posted in pies & tarts, sweet things | 12 Comments
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dahlia triple coconut cream pie

I grew up in Virginia.  Just as soon as I moved up to Boston for college, my family moved out to Seattle.  I go visit once or twice a year (I was just there a couple of weeks ago, in fact), so have a fondness for Seattle.  Being a born Southerner, I also have a fondness coconut and for cream pies, and, interestingly enough, Seattle has a legendary combo of the two– Dahlia Bakery’s (and Lounge’s) Triple Coconut Cream Pie.  It is dangerously good, and I’ve been holding off making it at home until I had a real excuse.  The Seahawks’ Sunday performance was good enough for me.

This pie has a coconut crust, a coconut filling and toasted coconut on top…hence the whole “triple” thing.  You’ll notice the recipe instructions are…ummm….lengthy.  Nothing’s hard, though, especially if you break it up a bit.  With a multi-step pie like this, I like to get ready the day before by processing my crust, letting it chill a bit and then getting it in the pan.  That way it can really set in the fridge overnight, which not only helps it hold a better crimp while baking, but it means a lot less work the following day.  Another crusty trick I have up my sleeve is that after the crust is fully baked, but still piping hot, I paint a touch of egg white on the bottom.  It gives it a little barrier of protection from the soft filling and helps keep it crisp.  Usually the residual heat coming off the pie shell will set the egg white straight away, but you can always pop it back in the oven for about a minute to make sure.  You can also make the coconut pastry cream a day ahead if you’d like…just keep it airtight in the fridge overnight with some plastic wrap pressed on the surface.

This coco pie is soft but crisp, rich but light.  It’s no wonder, really, that Dahlia has sold something like 350,000 of these things.

dahlia triple coconut cream pie

Dahlia Triple Coconut Cream Pie– makes a 9-inch pie
adapted from The Dahlia Bakery Cookbook: Sweetness in Seattle by Tom Douglas and Shelley Lance

for the coconut pastry dough–makes a 9-inch piecrust

Steph’s Notes: The crust must be baked and cooled before you can fill your pie. If you’d like, you can “seal” the bottom your just-out-of-the-oven hot crust with a little thinly brushed on egg white…this will help keep it crisp when it’s filled.  I also like to go ahead and toast the coconut chips for garnish while I have the oven on during this step.  400° is a little high for coconut, so I do this while the oven is coming up to temp or after I’ve turned it off and it’s coming back down (watching closely so it doesn’t burn).

1 cup plus 2 tbsp flour (165 g), plus extra for rolling dough
1/2 cup (50 g) shredded sweetened coconut
1/2 cup (113 g or 1 stick) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch dice
2 tsp sugar
1/4 tsp kosher salt
1/3 cup (75 g) ice-cold water, or more as needed

-In the bowl of a food processor fitted with a metal blade, combine flour, coconut, sugar and salt and pulse two or three times to combine.  Add the diced butter and pulse to form coarse crumbs.  Gradually add water, 1 tablespoon at a time, pulsing each time.  Use only as much water as needed for the dough to hold together when pressed gently between your fingers (don’t work dough with your hands, just test to see if it is holding).  The dough will not form a ball or even clump together in the processor, it will be quite loose.

-Place a large sheet of plastic wrap on the counter and dump the coconut dough onto it.  Pull plastic wrap around dough, forcing it into a rough flattened round with the pressure of the plastic wrap.  Refrigerate 30 to 60 minutes before rolling.

-When ready to roll dough, unwrap round of coconut dough and place it on a lightly floured board.  Flour rolling pin and your hands. Roll out dough in a circle about 1/8-inch thick.  Occasionally lift dough with a bench knife or scraper to check that it is not sticking, and add more flour if it seems like it’s about to stick.  Trim to a 12- to 13-inch round.   Transfer rolled dough to a 9-inch pie pan.  Ease dough loosely and gently into pan.  You don’t want to stretch dough at his point, because it will shrink when it is baked.

-Trim any excess dough to 1- to 11/2-inch overhang.  Turn dough under along rim of pie pan and use your fingers and thumb to flute the edge.  Dock the bottom of the shell with a fork.  Refrigerate unbaked pie shell for at least 1 hour before baking (this prevents the dough from shrinking in the oven).

-When ready to bake piecrust, preheat oven to 400°F.  Place a piece of parchment in pie shell, with sides overhanging the pan, and fill with dried beans or wieghts (this prevents the bottom of the shell from puffing up during baking).  Bake piecrust for 20 to 25 minutes, or until pastry rim is golden.  Remove pie pan from oven.  Remove paper and beans and return piecrust to oven.  Bake for an additional 10 to 12 minutes, or until bottom of crust has golden brown patches. Remove from oven and allow pie shell to cool completely.

for the coconut pastry cream:

1 cup (230 g) milk
1 cup (230 g) canned unsweetened coconut milk, stirred
2 cups (170 g) shredded sweetened coconut
1 vanilla bean, split in half lengthwise
2 large eggs
1/2 cup plus 2 tbsp. (125 g) sugar
3 tbsp. (26 g) AP flour
4 tbsp. (57 g or 1/2 stick) unsalted butter, at room temperature

- In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, combine milk, coconut milk and shredded coconut.  Using a paring knife, scrape seeds from vanilla bean and add both scrapings and pod to milk mixture.  Stir occasionally until mixture almost comes to a boil.

-In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, sugar and flour until well combined.  Temper eggs by pouring a small amount (about 1/3 cup) of scalded milk into egg mixture while whisking.  Then add warmed egg mixture to saucepan of milk and coconut. Whisk over medium-high heat until pastry cream thickens and begins to bubble. Keep whisking until mixture is very thick, 4 to 5 minutes more.  Remove saucepan from heat. Add butter and whisk until it melts.  Remove and discard vanilla pod.

-Transfer pastry cream to a bowl and place it over another bowl of ice water.  Stir occasionally until pastry cream is cool.  Place a piece of plastic wrap directly on surface of pastry cream (to prevent a skin from forming) and refrigerate until completely cold.  The pastry cream will continue to thicken as it cools.

for the whipped cream topping:

Steph’s Notes:  This is a ton of whipped cream!  If you’d like to be a little less extravagant here, cut it in half and you’ll still have plenty of topping.

2 1/2 cups (600 g) heavy cream, chilled
1/3 cup (63 g) sugar
1 tsp vanilla extract

-In an electric mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, whip heavy cream with sugar and vanilla extract to peaks that are firm enough to hold their shape.

for the garnish:

2 oz (57 g) unsweetened chip or large-shred coconut (about 1 1/2 cups), or shredded sweetened coconut (about 2/3 cup)
a chunk of white chocolate (4-6 oz ,to make 2 oz of curls)

-Preheat oven to 350°.  Spread unsweetened coconut chips (or large-shred coconut, or sweetened shredded coconut) on a baking sheet and toast in the oven for 7 to 8 minutes, watching carefully (coconut burns easily) and stirring once or twice until lightly browned.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool.

to finish the pie:

-When pastry cream is cold, fill pastry shell, smoothing the surface with a rubber spatula.

-Transfer whipped cream to a pastry bag fitted with a star tip and pipe it all over the surface of the pie (or just mound it on top and swirl with a spoon).

-Sprinkle toasted coconut over top of pie.  Use a vegetable peeler to scrape about 2 ounces of white chocolate curls on top of the pie (or you can cut pie into wedges, garnish each wedge individually on the plate) and serve.

-Store the pie in the refrigerator.

Sweet Potato Ginger Pie

November 25, 2013 at 11:39 am | Posted in pies & tarts, sweet things | 14 Comments
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sweet potato ginger pie

I’m not making Thanksgiving dinner myself this year.  You never know what you’re gonna get when you’re not in charge, so I had to make a pre-Thanksgiving pie for the two of us here at home.

I mixed things up from the typical pumpkin pie by making a sweet potato one.  To tell you the truth, I think that pumpkins and sweet potatoes can make pretty interchangeable pie fillings in terms of taste, because they’re often identically spiced.  This pie, though, mixes it up a bit in the spice department.  It’s a little more ginger-heavy than most– a little more zippy– and leaves out the traditional cloves entirely.  When I make a pumpkin pie I normally reach for a can-opener, but this filling uses a fresh-roasted sweet potato.  If you have a big potato left over from last night’s dinner, you can use that, no problem.  Using a fresh sweet potato for a custard pie gives a slightly different texture than canned pumpkin does.  The sweet potato filling is not quite as velvety smooth as pumpkin filling– it’s a little more dense and substantial.

Happy Thanksgiving!

sweet potato ginger pie

Sweet Potato Ginger Pie- makes a 9-inch pie
adapted from the wonderfully reliable Melissa Clark

Steph’s Note: To speed things along, you can cook the sweet potato in advance or use a leftover one for this pie.  Just bring it to room temperature before processing the filling.

single-crust recipe of your favorite flaky pastry dough, well-chilled
1 c cooked sweet potato

3/4 c heavy cream
1/2 c milk
3 eggs
2/3 c light brown sugar
2 tbsp brandy, bourbon or rum
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
1 tsp ground cinnamon
3/4 tsp ground ginger
1/8 tsp salt

-To make the filling, cut a slit into one large sweet potato and wrap tightly in foil.  Bake at 400°F until sweet potato is very soft, about an hour.  Let cool.

-Meanwhile, on a lightly floured surface, roll out the piecrust to a 12-inch circle.  Transfer the crust to a 9-inch pie plate.  Fold over any excess dough, then crimp as decoratively as you can manage.

-Prick the crust all over with a fork and freeze it for at least 15 minutes.  Cover the pie with aluminum foil or parchment and fill with pie weights.  Bake at 400°F for 20 minutes (you can do this while the sweet potato is also in the oven).  Remove the foil or parchment and weights and bake until golden, about 5 to 10 minutes more.  Cool on a rack until needed.

-Scoop 1 cup of cooked, cooled sweet potato into food processor, discarding skin.  Reduce oven temperature to 325°F.  Add all remaining filling ingredients to food processor and puree until smooth.  You can skip this, but if you want to smooth the filling out a bit more, strain it by pressing through a fine sieve.

-Spoon filling into pie crust and spread until flat and even.  Place pie on a rimmed baking sheet and bake until the custard is mostly firm and set but jiggles slightly when moved, 45 to 55 minutes.  Let cool to room temperature and serve with whipped cream.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Baked Yogurt Tart

July 2, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 14 Comments
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baked yogurt tart

Leslie Mackie ‘s Baked Yogurt Tart was one that I was rooting for in this month’s recipe nominations.  The combination of fruit and yogurt in a pie crust sounded pretty good to me!

Instead of using berries for my tart, I pitted some of the sweet cherries I got from my CSA.  I see now that I could have squeezed lots more cherries in there…I’ll keep that in mind when I make this again (which may be for this weekend’s BBQ with the in-laws).  Also, I left the chopped almonds off my tart and added in a little almond extract instead.

The recipe says to bake it till brown on top.  Mine took the full baking time but was nowhere near golden brown afterwards.  I didn’t want to overbake it and since I could tell the custard was set, I just went ahead and took it out.  When cut, this tart held its shape and reminded me of a cheesecake.  I actually thought the filling could be a tad softer– I’m not sure if it was the thick Greek yogurt I used, or if the amount of flour used to thicken the filling could be reduced a bit (3/4 cup is a lot of flour!).  I may fiddle with a couple of things next time I make this, but, all in all, it’s a tasty spin on a summer fruit tart.

baked yogurt tart

We’re going without hosts now for TWD, so for the recipe see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here, and there’s a video, too).   Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: French Apple Tart

January 22, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 13 Comments
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French apple cake

I made Leslie Mackie’s French Apple Tart back in the fall, when I had heaps of pink-skinned apples from my CSA.   Good thinking, because the apples I’ve had lately haven’t been so great.  If the tart looks a little familiar, maybe that’s because it’s a sister to the Normandy Apple Tart we made in TWD 1.0 about a year ago.

This tart is easy to make, but it isn’t a quick throw-together.  Get prepared…you can do some of these things in advance.  You need pie dough, apple compote for the filling (this one’s made in the oven) and lots of thinly sliced apples to spiral on top.  It certainly is pretty, though, not to mention delicate and delicious.  Your friends will think it came from a pâtisserie.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read Gaye’s Laws of The Kitchen.  It’s also here (and there’s even a video of Leslie and Julia making the tart together).  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Concord Grape Pie

September 25, 2012 at 2:30 pm | Posted in pies & tarts, sweet things | 16 Comments
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concord grape pie

Last Saturday, my CSA workshift rolled around (cuz you know, apparently CSAs are socialist).  To tell the truth, I was kind of dreading standing there for three hours early on a weekend morning, but as it turned out, the weather was great and I got the job I wsa hoping for.  I got to weigh out the coveted concord grapes that were last week’s fruit share.  Actually I got to dole out both grapes and advice.  Pretty much everyone who came through asked what to do with them.  How about eat them…juice them…jam them…pie them?!?!  Being the grape mistress also meant I got first dibs on leftovers when we cleaned up.  I took home a few extra stems…enough in total to make both concord grape jam and a little pie of my own.

Concord grapes are like the grapiest grapes there are.  They’re the grapes that “grape-flavored” things imitate.  And they are the most dreamy shade of purpley blue.  When I recommended to my fellow CSA-ers that they make a pie, most of them looked at me like I had two heads.  I guess a grape pie does sound a little weird, but it is so, so delicious.  Jammy and sweet and purple.

Now that I’ve talked up these grapes, here’s the bad news.  They have seeds.  Hard seeds that are unpleasant to eat, and IMO must be removed.  Making a pie from them is a labor of love, but I’m willing to put in the time to de-seed.  I don’t mind so much turning on the radio and zoning out with a little kitchen prep.  Anyway, it is a once a year treat, and the time spent makes every bite taste that much better.

concord grape pie

Concord Grape Pie- makes a 9-inch pie
heavily adapted from a recipe in Bon Appétit (September 2008)

Steph’s Note: If concords aren’t available where you live, or you’d like a more year-round, less labor-intensive alternative, see the original recipe (which uses seedless red grapes).

8 cups stemmed concord grapes (about 2 1/2 pounds), rinsed well and patted dry
3/4 cup sugar
1/3 cup cornstarch
1/4 tsp salt
squeeze of lemon juice
double-crust recipe of your favorite flaky pastry dough (I used Dorie’s), divided into two disks and well-chilled
1 large egg, beaten to blend (for glaze)
1 T turbinado or granulated sugar

-Slice grapes in half and remove the seeds.  Transfer grapes (and their skins, which tend to easily slip off–don’t worry about it) to large sieve set over large bowl.  Drain off grape liquid, saving 2 tablespoons.

-Whisk 3/4 cup sugar, cornstarch and salt in another large bowl to blend.  Mix in drained grapes, reserved juice and squeeze of lemon juice.

-Preheat your oven to 375°F.  Roll out one disk of dough on floured surface to a 13-inch round; transfer to pie dish.  Brush dough edge with egg glaze.  Fill with grape mixture.  Roll out the second disk of dough to a 12-inch round.  Top pie with dough; trim overhang to 1/2 inch.  Roll edge under and crimp.  Brush top of pie with glaze; sprinkle with raw sugar.  Cut several slits  in top crust to allow steam to escape.  Chill the pie until your oven is fully heated.

-Bake pie until golden and juices bubble thickly, 60 to 70 minutes, slipping a baking sheet under the pie plate at the halfway point.  Cool the pie on a rack to warm or room temperature, 2 to 3 hours.  You should think about having vanilla ice cream on hand.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Crunchy Summer Fruit Galette

August 9, 2012 at 5:07 pm | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 11 Comments
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crunchy summer fruit galette

This week it’s Thursday with Dorie.  Oops, someone didn’t pay attention…my bad.  Anyway, here is Flo Braker’s Crunchy Berry Galette, made instead with peaches and red currants from my CSA.  A galette is a freeform pie.  I make little individual ones everyday at the shop where I work, but we call them crostatas, cuz we’re Italian like that.

This galette has an unusal dough…it’s not a flaky pie pastry.  It gets it’s crunch from cornmeal and softness from sour cream.  The dough is seriously sticky, but I rolled and formed it directly on the parchment I used for baking, so I didn’t really have issues with it.  I added a tiny spoon of cornstarch to the filling just to tighten it up a bit.  I still had a little leaky juice, but no major explosion.  This was small, perfect for two with ice cream.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read  Lisa’s Tomato Thymes in the Kitchen and Garden and Andrea’s The Kitchen Lioness.  It’s also here.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Blueberry-Nectarine Pie

July 31, 2012 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 17 Comments
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blueberry-nectarine pie

Yeah, I know that just a couple of weeks ago I declared crisp to be the new pie.  And now here I am with an old school pie.  A big pie, too…not my normal half-sizer, but a full nine-inch pie.  A pie that I can eat while I watch the Olympics– ha!  Leslie Mackie’s Blueberry-Nectarine Pie is actually a favorite recipe.  I’ve made this pie several times in summers past and it’s always great.  I really love nectarines, even more than peaches, I think.

There are a couple of wacky instructions in the recipe that I don’t go by.  First, it says to assemble the pie in a one-inch tall nine-inch cake pan.  That’s weird…why not use a pie pan?  I do.  Then it says to cool the pie for 30 minutes before cutting.  Trust me, it needs to cool much longer than that if you don’t want your filling to pour out when you slice it.  I always try to bake my pies in the morning, so that by dinner time, they are well-set.

By the way, I spent last week on the West Coast, mainly visiting my family in Seattle.  I had my mother take me to Mackie’s Macrina Bakery in SODO one afternoon.  I didn’t see this pie there, but the breads are amazing.

blueberry-nectarine pie

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan or read  Hilary’s Manchego’s Kitchen and Liz’s That Skinny Chick Can Bake.  It’s also here.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Chocolate Truffle Tartlets

February 21, 2012 at 12:02 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 59 Comments
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chocolate truffle tartlets

It’s back to the sweets with this week’s Tuesdays with Dorie, which I am excited to be co-hosting along with Spike, Jaime and Jessica.  We’re doing David Ogonowski’s Chocolate Truffle Tartlets, and they are every bit as intense as the name sounds.  A chocolate crust is the vessel for a dark chocolate filling loaded with milk and white chocolate bits and pieces of crunchy cookie (I used amaretti, but biscotti are suggested, too).  The filling isn’t a straightforward ganache, but a baked chocolate filling made with whipped egg yolks.  The ribbony yolks give the filling some lift and structure.  They don’t bake up exactly cakey or moussey, but kind of somewhere in between.  Although the recipe says they are best enjoyed day of, I thought the tartlets were fantastic eaten chilled the next day, when they were like candy bars.

These tartlets may be small, but they pack a chocolate punch.  A tartlet may be uaually meant for one, but I think these are so rich that they are made for sharing.  A couple of notes about my personal experience here– I used a 60% chocolate in my filling base…I thought it was a tad too sweet when combined with the extra chocolate and cookie bits.  Next time I’d go with a 70-something% for a bit more balance.  Also, while the chocolate tart dough in this recipe is almost exactly the same as the one in BFMHTY,  that one (BFMHTY) uses powdered sugar instead of granulated, and I think it may be a bit easier to work with.

For the recipe, you should see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan, but I also have it below.  My co-hosts Spike, Jaime and Jessica will have it as well.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Chocolate Truffle Tartlets
recipe by David Ogonowski in Baking with Julia
by Dorie Greenspan

Steph’s Notes: You can watch the PBS episode of David and Julia making this recipe by viewing these links: Part 1  Part 2.  I added a pinch of salt to my tart filling.

for the chocolate dough
1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, preferably Dutch-processed
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1 stick (4 oz) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1 large egg yolk
1 tbsp ice water

for the truffle filling
5 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into 10 pieces
6 oz bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
8 large egg yolks
1 tsp vanilla extract
¼ cup sugar
2 oz white chocolate, cut into small dice
2 oz milk chocolate, cut into small dice
 4 biscotti, homemade or store-bought (you can use amaretti di Saronno), chopped

-To make the dough in a food processor: Put the metal blade in the processor and add the flour, cocoa, sugar, and salt. Pulse just to blend. Add the butter and pulse 8 to 10 times, until the pieces are about the size of small peas. With the machine running, add the yolk and ice water and pulse just until crumbly – don’t overwork it. Turn it out onto the work surface and, working with small portions, smear the dough across the surface with the heel of your hand.  Gather the dough together and shape it into a rough square. Pat it down to compress it slightly, and wrap it in plastic. Chill until firm, at least 30 minutes. The dough will hold in the refrigerator for 3 days, or it can be wrapped airtight and frozen for a month. Thaw the dough, still wrapped, overnight in the refrigerator before rolling it out.

-To make the dough by hand: Put the flour, cocoa, sugar, and salt on a smooth work surface, preferably a cool surface such as marble. Toss the ingredients together lightly with your fingertips, then scatter the butter pieces across the dry ingredients. Use your fingertips to work the butter into the flour mixture until it forms pieces the size of small peas. Then use a combination of techniques to work the butter further into the flour: Break it up with your fingertips, rub it lightly between your palms, and chop it with the flat edge of a plastic or metal dough scraper. Gather the mixture into a mound, make a volcano-like well in the center, and pour in the yolk and ice water. Use your fingers to break up the yolk and start moistening the dry ingredients. Then, just as you did with the flour and butter, toss the ingredients with your fingers and use the dough scraper to chop and blend it. The dough will be crumbly and not really cohesive. Bring it together by smearing small portions of it across the work surface with the heel of your hand. Gather into a square and chill as directed above.

-Line a jelly-roll pan with parchment paper and keep at hand. Remove the bottoms from six 4 ½-inch fluted tartlet pans (or use pans with permanent bottoms and just plan to pop the tartlet out once they’re filled, baked, and cooled); spray the pans with vegetable oil or brush with melted butter.

-Cut the dough into 6 even pieces. Working with one piece at a time, shape the dough into a rough circle, then tamp it down with a rolling pin. Flour the work surface and the top of the dough and roll it into a circle about 1/8 to ¼- inch thick. As you roll, lift the dough with the help of a dough scraper to keep it from sticking. If the dough breaks (as it sometimes does), press it back together and keep going-it will be fine once it’s baked. Fit the dough into a tartlet ring, pressing it into the fluted edges and cutting the top level with the edges of the pan. Again, patch as you go. Use a pastry brush to dust off any excess flour and place the lined tartlet ring on the prepared baking pan.

-When all of the shells are rolled out and formed, chill them for at least 20 minutes.

-Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F. Prick the bottoms of the crusts all over with the tines of a fork and bake for 12 to 15 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through the baking time, until the crusts are dry, blistery, and firm. Transfer the baking pan to a rack so that the crusts can cool while you make the filling. Reduce the oven temperature to 300°F.

-Bring an inch of water to the simmer in a saucepan. Put the butter and bittersweet chocolate in a large metal bowl and place the bowl over the saucepan-don’t let the metal bowl touch the water. Allow the chocolate and butter to melt slowly, stirring from time to time, as you work on the rest of the filling. Remove the chocolate from the heat when it is melted and allow it to cool until it is just slightly warmer than room temperature.

-Put the yolks and vanilla extract in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or in a large mixing bowl. Using the whisk or a hand-held mixer, start beating the yolks at medium speed and them, when they are broken up, reduce the speed to low and gradually add the sugar. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat the yolks and sugar until the yolks thicken and form a slowly dissolving ribbon when the beater is lifted.

-Spoon about one third of the yolks onto the cooled chocolate mixture and fold them in with a rubber spatula. Don’t worry about being too thorough. Pour the chocolate into the beaten yolks and gently fold the two mixtures together until they are almost completely blended. Add the cubed chocolates and biscotti, folding to incorporate the chunky pieces.

- Using an ice cream scoop or ¼ cup measure, divide the filling evenly among the cooled shells. Smooth the filling with a small offset spatula, working it into the nooks and crannies as you circle the tops of the tarts. Bake the tarts for 10 to 12 minutes, until the tops look dry and the filling is just set. Remove to a rack to cool for about 20 minutes before serving.

-Best the day they’re made, these are still terrific after they’ve been refrigerated—they lose their textual finesse, but the taste is still very much there. For longer keeping, wrap the tartlets airtight and freeze them for up to a month. Thaw, still wrapped, at room temperature.

TWD Rewind: Honey-Almond Prune Tart

January 24, 2012 at 8:19 pm | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 5 Comments
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honey-almond prune tart

When Kayte chose a Honey-Almond Fig Tart for TWD pick last month, I didn’t bake the recipe because figs were out of season and I was drawing a blank on a good sub.  Then it dawned on me that prunes would be a delicious partner for a honey-almond cream tart…especially if those prunes were quickly poached in simmering red wine and that almond cream had a little orange zest in it.  So that’s exactly what I did.  And it was great.  I’m a fan of frangipane tarts (here’s another good one), and I could really taste the honey in this almond cream.  The prunes gave the tart a bit of sticky chewiness.

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read Grandma’s Kitchen Table, as it was Kayte’s pick about a month ago.

Tuesdays with Dorie: Puffed Double Plum Tart

December 13, 2011 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 7 Comments
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puffed double plum tart

This is one of last recipes left in the rotation from BFMHTY.  I may have had to pass on it, cuz there are no plums around right now, but in a rare moment of genius forethought, I made this Puffed Double Plum Tart back in September.  Actually, I was just looking for things to do with all my summer CSA plums before they died a long, slow death in my fridge, but whatever.

Why is it called “double plum”?  Double plum turns out to equal plums plus prunes.  The prunes are jazzed up with a quick red wine poach, and that’s really the most difficult step of this whole thing.  Certainly save that sweet winey poaching liquid and reduce it into a quick sauce, so your family is tricked into thinking this was harder than just arranging some plums and prunes atop a square of store-bought puff pastry.  I liked this, not only for its ease, but also because red wine steeped prunes are incredibly delicious.  So delicious that you could probably skip the fresh plums and make this mid-winter afterall.

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read Julie’s blog, Someone’s in the KitchenAnd see TWD founder Laurie’s blog for Unbelievably Good Chocolate Blueberry Ice Cream, this week’s other recipe (which I unfortunately did not make this week, but I look forward to seeing your reviews). Don’t forget to check out the TWD Blogroll!

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