Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Pear-Cranberry Roll-Up Tart

November 24, 2015 at 12:01 am | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 8 Comments
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pear-cranberry roll-up tart

I’ve had my Thanksgiving dessert plotted out for weeks now (predictably, it will be a pumpkin pie), but if I didn’t, I think that this Pear-Cranberry Roll-Up Tart would be making another appearance on Thursday.  Yes, a “roll-up tart”…intriguing, right?  I’ve never made a roll-up tart before.  I imagined forming it would be like making a strudel with pie dough, but actually it was more like rolling up a burrito.

The filling here is made from seasonally appropriate pears– I used Bosc– and cranberries.  I think baked pear desserts are pretty awesome, and the orange and ginger flavorings in this filling really compliment the pears (and the cranberries, too).

The fruit is rolled inside the very same galette dough we used for our Apple Pielettes last month.  I’m big on this dough.  It couldn’t be easier to  handle and it bakes up really flaky (the sanding sugar on top here is a nice sparkly, crispy touch).  Also, it slices cleanly, so you get a good presentation instead of a crumbly mess.  I’ll certainly be trying it out on a regular pie at some point.

pear-cranberry roll-up tart

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.  Happy Thanksgiving!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Apple Pielettes

October 27, 2015 at 7:00 am | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 20 Comments
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apple pielettes

Sometimes I just don’t want to share a dessert.  When I want my very own cake, I have a cupcake.  When I want a pie all to myself–let’s not talk about the time I ate an entire Mrs. Smith’s for dinner–  these Apple Pielettes, made in a muffin tin, will fit the bill nicely.

This recipe uses Dorie’s galette dough.  I don’t think we’ve made it before, but it was easy to do in the food processor and easy to work with. Remembering the kuchen from a few weeks ago, I was mentally prepared to be annoyed fitting the dough into cavities of the muffin tin, but this was actually no problem at all (although you’ll probably find that you need to cut your dough circles slightly larger than the recipe states if you really want to fill the tins).  The dough baked flaky and crisp…I’d use it for big-girl pies, too.

The filling is nice, with apple, of course, (which I didn’t bother to peel) and flavors from dried apricots, raisins and a bit of orange marmalade.  If you are an all-American apple pie purist, I’m sure you could fiddle with the insides to get just what you want.  After all, it’s your very own pie.

apple pielettes

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Brioche Tart with White Secret Sauce

September 1, 2015 at 3:00 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, sweet yeast breads, tuesdays with dorie | 11 Comments
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brioche tart with white secret sauce

Nancy Silverton’s Brioche Tart with White Secret Sauce is known as “the tart that made Julia cry.”  If you don’t know why, then you’ll just have to watch the end of this video to see.  We’ve used brioche before to make tarts, back in the BFMHTY days.  Seems unusual and maybe it’s just called a tart because of its shape, but brioche is a good base to hold up to juicy fruit.  This tart has a quick and easy crème fraiche (although I really used labneh) custard filling and is topped at serving time with a “secret sauce” and poached fruit.  I didn’t need a box of tissues to eat this myself, but it’s plenty good, thankfully, as there’s a lot to do to if you make all the components.

Formed in a ring or a cake pan, the brioche bakes up golden and fluffy, with a tall back crust.  I was a bit worried that the custard in the center wouldn’t set, but it did.  “White Secret Sauce” sounds a little dodgy to me, but really it’s innocent enough…a sabayon folded with whipped cream.  The sabayon is made with caramelized sugar and wine, but if you didn’t want to take the time to make it, the tart would be absolutely fine, and a bit less sweet, with just some fruit for garnish.  I quick-poached some ripe apricots and plums in a portion of my caramel-wine syrup, but again, if you can’t be bothered and have nice fresh fruit, just use it as-is or macerate it with a light amount of sugar.  You can also use dried fruit, in which case I do think they would be better plumped in liquid.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here and there’s a video, too). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Cherry Crumb Tart

August 11, 2015 at 1:25 pm | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 13 Comments
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cherry crumb tart

We’re on a roll with tasty tarts from Baking Chez Moi and this week we’re continuing to make the most out of summer fruit with a Cherry Crumb Tart.  Here, we have our old friend STD (sweet tart dough, that is) housing lots of fresh cherries that are nestled in an almond frangipane filling and topped with streusel crumbs.  Yum, right!?!   This tart sounds like it has a lot of components, but you can make your dough (and roll and pan it, too), frangipane and crumb topping all a day or two ahead of time.  Then when you’re ready to go, just par-bake your crust, pit your cherries and follow the bake-off instructions.

When I came home from vacay, I was pretty sure the summer’s cherries were a thing of the past (just like that gorgeous Montana view…boo) and I planned to pick up a punnet of blackberries to use in this tart instead.  But lo and behold, I found some sour cherries at the greenmarket and snapped them right up.  Sweet cherries would be just as good here, btw.  My streusel didn’t really keep it’s crumbly, piecey shapes in the oven but kind of melded together into a (quite sweet) crispy shell.  Not sure why, since I used cold ingredients and chilled it overnight, but it was still delicious.  I flavored it only with cardamom, no orange zest, and thought it was the perfect subtle flavoring to go with the cherries and almonds.  I liked the tart with a little whipped cream and thought it held up just fine in the fridge for a couple of days, as we cut off slices after dinner and whittled it down to nothing.

I’m wishing now that I’d taken a side view photo of a slice.  It really was full of red cherries!  For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Apricot-Raspberry Tart

July 14, 2015 at 12:22 pm | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 30 Comments
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apricot-raspberry tart

A full-on fruit tart is never one of my go-to desserts.  I don’t know why, since I’m big on the combo of fruit and crust…I can certainly get behind a good slice of pie or a big scoop of crisp.  But I just don’t really think of fruit tarts.  It takes the peer pressure of organized group baking to get me to make one, like this Apricot-Raspberry Tart, and remember how spectacular they can be.

This tart is really all about the apricots.  Luckily, they’re in season now where I live, and at the farmers’ market I found baskets of the tiniest blushing apricots.  Even though I made a small tart using a half batch of sweet dough, I was able to stuff it full of the little guys.  At the bottom of the tart shell. a layer of cake or brioche crumbs (or even ladyfingers) acts as a sponge to absorb any juices from the baked fruit.  At the restaurant where I work, cakes for specials orders are usually baked off as sheets that are then punched out and assembled in ring molds.  That means there’s always some cake off-cut or trim in the walk-in that’s up for grabs.  I took home an square of hazelnut cake last week with this this tart in mind.  My apricots and raspberries held shape pretty well and didn’t release too much juice, but I liked the added flavor that the hazelnut cake crumbs gave.  Having used it, I garnished my tart with some candied hazelnuts instead of the pistachios Dorie suggests.

apricot-raspberry tart

Really, this tart was so pretty I hesitated to cut it!  It’s a fine treat to celebrate Bastille Day today.  Even though it may be best eaten up the day of baking, we had a couple of slices left over and I don’t think they suffered too much from a night in the fridge.  For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

TWD Rewind: Gâteau Basque

June 30, 2015 at 7:04 pm | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 9 Comments
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gâteau basque

Okay, so this recipe isn’t from BWJ, BCM or even BFMHTY, but it is from another Dorie book,  Around my French Table, so I’m trying to pass it off as a rewind this week and hope no one calls me out on it.  Also, I’ve made it before, but I liked it enough to play around with it again.

I don’t have a lot of new insight or commentary to add here.  It’s still so tasty!  I just wanted to show that, even though cherries (which I used last time) are the traditional Gâteau Basque fruit filling, you don’t have to be bound by tradition.  Here, along with pastry cream, I used roasted strawberries that I had leftover from last week’s shortcake.  The delicious cookie-like double crust would be great sandwiching so many different fruits.  Using fruit that’s cooked in some way, whether that be candied, roasted, jammed or sauced, is most ideal, since the fruit is concentrated and you’ll have less liquid seeping into the crust.  I plan to try jammy plums next time.

For the recipe, see Around my French Table by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll to see if anyone else did a rewind this week

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Sweet Ricotta Pie

April 7, 2015 at 10:50 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 6 Comments
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sweet ricotta pie

This Sweet Ricotta Pie from Nick Malgieri is the dessert version of his Pizza Rustica, which we made a few Easters ago.  It’s made with the same sweet, cookie-like pasta frolla dough and also has a ricotta-based filling.  Apart from the ricotta (and few eggs to bind), the filling is pretty simple and is just flavored with sugar, anisette and cinnamon.  I’m not wild about anisette, and thought the filling could use a little more pizzazz anyway, so I tweaked it a bit.  I had a small handful candied orange peel left from this year’s batch of Hot Cross Buns, so I soaked that, along with some golden raisins, in a good amount of Grand Marnier.  I kept the cinnamon, but stirred it into the filling along with the dried fruit (rather than sprinkling it in a layer on top).

This pie has good orange flavor, but the filling’s a little dry.  If I make this one again, I may try adding a few tablespoons of heavy cream to the batter or try swapping out a couple of the whole eggs for just yolks to see if that adds more moisture.  I like the pasta frolla dough, too, although I wish the lattice strips had gotten a little more color in the oven. Looking back, I see that with the Rustica, I eggwashed the lattice for some browning action…seems I always look back a little too late.

sweet ricotta pie

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Not-Your-Usual Lemon Meringue Pie

March 3, 2015 at 6:01 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 24 Comments
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not-your-usual lemon meringue pie

I’ve done a pretty traditional LMP here before, so I guess it’s time to try out Gale Gand’s Not-Your-Usual Lemon Meringue Pie.  Forget about making pie crust for this– lemon curd and meringue are sandwiched Napoleon-style between layers of crispy sugared phyllo dough.  BTW, based on the previous Gale Gand stuff we’ve made, I was not at all surprised to see phyllo pop up here.

This is a pretty dessert and it’s pretty straightforward, too.  It does need to be served fairly soon after it’s stacked up, but you can make the lemon curd and bake the phyllo crisps plenty ahead of time.  Wait till the last minute to get the brown sugar Swiss meringue done, though.

We liked this “pie” a lot.  The pretty layers do smoosh as soon is they’re hit with a fork, but that’s okay.  The lemon curd is a gentle one…not too puckery.  The recipe left me with extra curd, which is no problem in my books, but I would recommend reducing the meringue amount by at least a couple of whites, if not by half.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here).  Here’s a video of the BWJ episode (this dessert is in the second half).  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Blood Orange Tart

February 24, 2015 at 8:05 am | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 16 Comments
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blood orange tart

I only seem to get my hands on a few blood oranges each winter and when I do, I always think I should to do something special with them.  That’s why last week I took Dorie’s Pink Grapefruit Tart and turned it into a blood orange one.  This tart is a take on a favorite of hers called Pétale de Pamplemousse from Hugo & Victor, a swanky shop in Paris.  It has a sweet tart shell with a layer of lemon-almond frangipane cream hidden under a rich citrusy crémeux.  Frangipane we’ve done before, but crémeux is a pastry cream luxuriously enriched with heaps of butter and softly set with gelatin. These several steps each have their own wait times as well, so it’s best to spread the process out over two days.

OK, here’s where I ran into trouble on this one…I’m not a vegetarian, but I don’t eat red meat so I try to avoid gelatin, too.  I also try to not get too crazy about it, because I’ve worked in kitchens for years and I know that gelatin gets slipped into things one would never even suspect.  But if I know it’s in there, I don’t go for it on a menu and I don’t make it at home.  The word “crémeux” is a tip-off that gelatin is involved (although some chocolate ones don’t need it to set), so I wanted to find my way around that to make this tart.  I tried agar-agar once, likely messed it up, and haven’t tried it again (although Zosia did and it looks great!).  I tried fish gelatin another time, had good success, but have since decided that I’m creeped out by it.  Poking around, I found that I had half a packet of a plant-based kosher gelatin in the cupboard.  I have absolutely no clue what I did with the other half of the packet…I remember buying the stuff but have no memory of using it….but it was about equal in amount to half the gelatin called for in the recipe, so I made a half-batch of everything (for a 7-inch tart) and added that to my cremeux base.  The next morning, however, my crémeux was still very loose, so either the setting ratio is different (the packet didn’t compare it to regular gelatin), or it was too old (I admit that I’d had it in the cupboard for quite a long time).  I broke down and brought home a leaf of sheet gelatin from work that night, scraped the cremeux back into the mixer, blitzed in the bloomed gelatin leaf and poured it straight into the crust to set.  Fine, that worked.

This tart was beautiful and perfectly delicious, and fresh citrus can certainly brighten up a frosty late Februaury day.  Dorie says you could omit the almond cream to skip a step and keep it simpler, but I really think the flavor adds a lot to the tart.  All that said, while I’m willing to tinker around with different gelatin alternatives (has anyone tried Natural Desserts Vegan Jel??), I’m not sure this will be a repeater for me.  If I make something this butter-heavy, generally I want it to be because frosting is involved…yeah, yeah, I’m a cake person.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

P.S.:  Enter my blogoversary GIVEAWAY here!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Cranberry Crackle Tart

November 25, 2014 at 12:01 am | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 18 Comments
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cranberry crackle tart

If you’re still on the fence about what to make for this Thursday’s dessert, let me make your decision harder by throwing one more option your way.  This Cranberry Crackle Tart from Baking Chez Moi is for people who don’t mind breaking a bit with Thanksgiving tradition.  It has a cookie-like base of sweet tart dough (fondly known to those in professional pastry circles as “STD”…we keep it classy), a layer of jam (which you can’t see here) and a meringue topping with cranberries folded though.  The topping is like a crispy-edged marshmallow– the sweetness is interrupted by little bursts of softened, tart berries.  This is meant to be a larger tart, but I didn’t need so much for the two of us on a random weeknight, so I just made a couple of individual tartlets (they took quite a bit less time to bake, btw).  The big one, with its pretty, swirly meringue top and ruby-colored berries peeking through, would make an impressive dessert for a crowd.  And it’s a light one, too, after a big dinner.

The hidden jam layer can be any red jam, really, like strawberry, raspberry or cherry.  I made a cranberry sauce ahead of time from the extra berries that weren’t going into the tart and I used that instead.  We ate our tarts with whipped cream, and my husband said it reminded him of pavlova with a cookie crust.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll and please join us, if you haven’t already!

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