Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Baked Yogurt Tart

July 2, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 14 Comments
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baked yogurt tart

Leslie Mackie ‘s Baked Yogurt Tart was one that I was rooting for in this month’s recipe nominations.  The combination of fruit and yogurt in a pie crust sounded pretty good to me!

Instead of using berries for my tart, I pitted some of the sweet cherries I got from my CSA.  I see now that I could have squeezed lots more cherries in there…I’ll keep that in mind when I make this again (which may be for this weekend’s BBQ with the in-laws).  Also, I left the chopped almonds off my tart and added in a little almond extract instead.

The recipe says to bake it till brown on top.  Mine took the full baking time but was nowhere near golden brown afterwards.  I didn’t want to overbake it and since I could tell the custard was set, I just went ahead and took it out.  When cut, this tart held its shape and reminded me of a cheesecake.  I actually thought the filling could be a tad softer– I’m not sure if it was the thick Greek yogurt I used, or if the amount of flour used to thicken the filling could be reduced a bit (3/4 cup is a lot of flour!).  I may fiddle with a couple of things next time I make this, but, all in all, it’s a tasty spin on a summer fruit tart.

baked yogurt tart

We’re going without hosts now for TWD, so for the recipe see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here, and there’s a video, too).   Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Chocolate Truffle Tartlets

February 21, 2012 at 12:02 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 59 Comments
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chocolate truffle tartlets

It’s back to the sweets with this week’s Tuesdays with Dorie, which I am excited to be co-hosting along with Spike, Jaime and Jessica.  We’re doing David Ogonowski’s Chocolate Truffle Tartlets, and they are every bit as intense as the name sounds.  A chocolate crust is the vessel for a dark chocolate filling loaded with milk and white chocolate bits and pieces of crunchy cookie (I used amaretti, but biscotti are suggested, too).  The filling isn’t a straightforward ganache, but a baked chocolate filling made with whipped egg yolks.  The ribbony yolks give the filling some lift and structure.  They don’t bake up exactly cakey or moussey, but kind of somewhere in between.  Although the recipe says they are best enjoyed day of, I thought the tartlets were fantastic eaten chilled the next day, when they were like candy bars.

These tartlets may be small, but they pack a chocolate punch.  A tartlet may be uaually meant for one, but I think these are so rich that they are made for sharing.  A couple of notes about my personal experience here– I used a 60% chocolate in my filling base…I thought it was a tad too sweet when combined with the extra chocolate and cookie bits.  Next time I’d go with a 70-something% for a bit more balance.  Also, while the chocolate tart dough in this recipe is almost exactly the same as the one in BFMHTY,  that one (BFMHTY) uses powdered sugar instead of granulated, and I think it may be a bit easier to work with.

For the recipe, you should see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan, but I also have it below.  My co-hosts Spike, Jaime and Jessica will have it as well.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Chocolate Truffle Tartlets
recipe by David Ogonowski in Baking with Julia
by Dorie Greenspan

Steph’s Notes: You can watch the PBS episode of David and Julia making this recipe by viewing these links: Part 1  Part 2.  I added a pinch of salt to my tart filling.

for the chocolate dough
1-1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder, preferably Dutch-processed
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
1 stick (4 oz) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1 large egg yolk
1 tbsp ice water

for the truffle filling
5 tbsp unsalted butter, cut into 10 pieces
6 oz bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped
8 large egg yolks
1 tsp vanilla extract
¼ cup sugar
2 oz white chocolate, cut into small dice
2 oz milk chocolate, cut into small dice
 4 biscotti, homemade or store-bought (you can use amaretti di Saronno), chopped

-To make the dough in a food processor: Put the metal blade in the processor and add the flour, cocoa, sugar, and salt. Pulse just to blend. Add the butter and pulse 8 to 10 times, until the pieces are about the size of small peas. With the machine running, add the yolk and ice water and pulse just until crumbly – don’t overwork it. Turn it out onto the work surface and, working with small portions, smear the dough across the surface with the heel of your hand.  Gather the dough together and shape it into a rough square. Pat it down to compress it slightly, and wrap it in plastic. Chill until firm, at least 30 minutes. The dough will hold in the refrigerator for 3 days, or it can be wrapped airtight and frozen for a month. Thaw the dough, still wrapped, overnight in the refrigerator before rolling it out.

-To make the dough by hand: Put the flour, cocoa, sugar, and salt on a smooth work surface, preferably a cool surface such as marble. Toss the ingredients together lightly with your fingertips, then scatter the butter pieces across the dry ingredients. Use your fingertips to work the butter into the flour mixture until it forms pieces the size of small peas. Then use a combination of techniques to work the butter further into the flour: Break it up with your fingertips, rub it lightly between your palms, and chop it with the flat edge of a plastic or metal dough scraper. Gather the mixture into a mound, make a volcano-like well in the center, and pour in the yolk and ice water. Use your fingers to break up the yolk and start moistening the dry ingredients. Then, just as you did with the flour and butter, toss the ingredients with your fingers and use the dough scraper to chop and blend it. The dough will be crumbly and not really cohesive. Bring it together by smearing small portions of it across the work surface with the heel of your hand. Gather into a square and chill as directed above.

-Line a jelly-roll pan with parchment paper and keep at hand. Remove the bottoms from six 4 ½-inch fluted tartlet pans (or use pans with permanent bottoms and just plan to pop the tartlet out once they’re filled, baked, and cooled); spray the pans with vegetable oil or brush with melted butter.

-Cut the dough into 6 even pieces. Working with one piece at a time, shape the dough into a rough circle, then tamp it down with a rolling pin. Flour the work surface and the top of the dough and roll it into a circle about 1/8 to ¼- inch thick. As you roll, lift the dough with the help of a dough scraper to keep it from sticking. If the dough breaks (as it sometimes does), press it back together and keep going-it will be fine once it’s baked. Fit the dough into a tartlet ring, pressing it into the fluted edges and cutting the top level with the edges of the pan. Again, patch as you go. Use a pastry brush to dust off any excess flour and place the lined tartlet ring on the prepared baking pan.

-When all of the shells are rolled out and formed, chill them for at least 20 minutes.

-Center a rack in the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F. Prick the bottoms of the crusts all over with the tines of a fork and bake for 12 to 15 minutes, rotating the pan halfway through the baking time, until the crusts are dry, blistery, and firm. Transfer the baking pan to a rack so that the crusts can cool while you make the filling. Reduce the oven temperature to 300°F.

-Bring an inch of water to the simmer in a saucepan. Put the butter and bittersweet chocolate in a large metal bowl and place the bowl over the saucepan-don’t let the metal bowl touch the water. Allow the chocolate and butter to melt slowly, stirring from time to time, as you work on the rest of the filling. Remove the chocolate from the heat when it is melted and allow it to cool until it is just slightly warmer than room temperature.

-Put the yolks and vanilla extract in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or in a large mixing bowl. Using the whisk or a hand-held mixer, start beating the yolks at medium speed and them, when they are broken up, reduce the speed to low and gradually add the sugar. Increase the speed to medium-high and beat the yolks and sugar until the yolks thicken and form a slowly dissolving ribbon when the beater is lifted.

-Spoon about one third of the yolks onto the cooled chocolate mixture and fold them in with a rubber spatula. Don’t worry about being too thorough. Pour the chocolate into the beaten yolks and gently fold the two mixtures together until they are almost completely blended. Add the cubed chocolates and biscotti, folding to incorporate the chunky pieces.

- Using an ice cream scoop or ¼ cup measure, divide the filling evenly among the cooled shells. Smooth the filling with a small offset spatula, working it into the nooks and crannies as you circle the tops of the tarts. Bake the tarts for 10 to 12 minutes, until the tops look dry and the filling is just set. Remove to a rack to cool for about 20 minutes before serving.

-Best the day they’re made, these are still terrific after they’ve been refrigerated—they lose their textual finesse, but the taste is still very much there. For longer keeping, wrap the tartlets airtight and freeze them for up to a month. Thaw, still wrapped, at room temperature.

TWD Rewind: Honey-Almond Prune Tart

January 24, 2012 at 8:19 pm | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 5 Comments
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honey-almond prune tart

When Kayte chose a Honey-Almond Fig Tart for TWD pick last month, I didn’t bake the recipe because figs were out of season and I was drawing a blank on a good sub.  Then it dawned on me that prunes would be a delicious partner for a honey-almond cream tart…especially if those prunes were quickly poached in simmering red wine and that almond cream had a little orange zest in it.  So that’s exactly what I did.  And it was great.  I’m a fan of frangipane tarts (here’s another good one), and I could really taste the honey in this almond cream.  The prunes gave the tart a bit of sticky chewiness.

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read Grandma’s Kitchen Table, as it was Kayte’s pick about a month ago.

Tuesdays with Dorie: Puffed Double Plum Tart

December 13, 2011 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 7 Comments
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puffed double plum tart

This is one of last recipes left in the rotation from BFMHTY.  I may have had to pass on it, cuz there are no plums around right now, but in a rare moment of genius forethought, I made this Puffed Double Plum Tart back in September.  Actually, I was just looking for things to do with all my summer CSA plums before they died a long, slow death in my fridge, but whatever.

Why is it called “double plum”?  Double plum turns out to equal plums plus prunes.  The prunes are jazzed up with a quick red wine poach, and that’s really the most difficult step of this whole thing.  Certainly save that sweet winey poaching liquid and reduce it into a quick sauce, so your family is tricked into thinking this was harder than just arranging some plums and prunes atop a square of store-bought puff pastry.  I liked this, not only for its ease, but also because red wine steeped prunes are incredibly delicious.  So delicious that you could probably skip the fresh plums and make this mid-winter afterall.

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read Julie’s blog, Someone’s in the KitchenAnd see TWD founder Laurie’s blog for Unbelievably Good Chocolate Blueberry Ice Cream, this week’s other recipe (which I unfortunately did not make this week, but I look forward to seeing your reviews). Don’t forget to check out the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie (on Sunday!): Normandy Apple Tart

December 4, 2011 at 9:19 pm | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 2 Comments
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Normandy apple tart

This Normandy Apple Tart is everything I think a French tart should be– chic and elegant and deceptively easy.  It’s a sweet tart dough with a simple applesauce filling and circles of sliced apples on top.  I love the way the apples brown on their tips…so pretty.

Dorie’s applesauce is really good.  In fact, I multiplied the recipe, because if you’re gonna make applesauce, you might as well make enough to enjoy even when the tart is finished. It has hardly any sugar and no spices, so the flavor is pure apple.  Putting it through a food mill (with the coarse disk) gives it a great texture.  When its baked in the tart, it firms enough to make perfectly clean slices.

Normandy apple tart

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read Tracey’s Culinary Adventures. Don’t forget to check out the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie: Alsatian Apple Tart

November 15, 2011 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 6 Comments
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Alsatian apple tart

This Alstatian Apple Tart made me think of cooking school.  We made one very similar during my first few weeks at the FCI.  That was years ago, but I liked it then and I like it now, too.  In fact, it was much nicer to make it at home, where the only judge is yours truly and I don’t have to wear an annoyingly scratchy neckerchief or wobbly paper toque.  It’s a pretty easy tart to make…a sweet dough, apple slices and a little custard.  I lightened up the custard in the book by only using one egg (and skipping the extra yolk), using a combo of milk and cream (rather than all cream) and skimping on the sugar.  My CSA is done for the year, but I’m still trying to use up the apples we got in the final couple pick-ups.  I have no idea what kind they are, but they are little, have red skins and were just fine in here.  Because this tart has the custard built-in, you don’t even need ice cream!

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read Jessica’s blog, cookbookhabit.  And see Lethally Delicious for Bittersweet Brownies, this week’s other recipe (which I unfortunately din’t get a chance to make this week). Don’t forget to check out the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie: A Tourtely Apple Tart

April 19, 2011 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 12 Comments
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a tourtely apple tart

Thinner than your typical apple pie, this double-crusted Tourtely Apple Tart has a gently spiced, chunky applesauce sandwiched between layers of sweet tart dough.  Since sweet tart dough is a cookie-like crust, the damp filling makes it soften up over time– in a very appealing way.  Something about it reminded me of the Cranberry Shortbread Cake we made a while back.  I think the way bumpy top crust drapes over the apple chunks is just beautiful.  I look forward to making this again in the peak of apple season.

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read The Whimsical Cupcake, as it was Jeannette’s pick this week.  Don’t forget to check out the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie: Coffee Ice Cream Tart

April 5, 2011 at 12:06 am | Posted in ice creams & frozen, pies & tarts, sweet things | 14 Comments
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coffee ice cream tart

It’s been awhile since we’ve made a Dorie ice cream concoction.  Well, allow me to make up for lost time by presenting you with a slice of Coffee Ice Cream Tart.  While you could very successfully use softened store-bought coffee (or any flavor, for that matter) ice cream in this tart, I went ahead and made my own.  I have lots of yolks in the freezer, and anyway, ice cream is one of my favorite things to make.  The ice cream is jazzed up with almond slices and extract, and the coffee-almond combo is a good one.  Add a little chocolate and it’s even better.  The crust was a little iffy, though, and it looks like several of us felt this way.  Mine sliced fine, but it was awfully hard to get through the frozen crust with a fork.  I had to resort to picking it up and eating it.  Not terrible, but maybe I just prefer ice cream cakes to tarts?

For the recipe, see Baking: From My Home to Yours by Dorie Greenspan or read Domestic Deep Thought, as it was Jessica’s pick this week.  Don’t forget to check out the TWD Blogroll!

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