Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Ka’kat

May 5, 2015 at 6:57 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 11 Comments
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ka kat

¡Feliz Cinco de Mayo!  Maybe you are getting a tres leches soaking or quadruple checking a mole recipe to make sure you didn’t miss an ingredient.  If you are thinking about flatbreads today, you’re probably thinking about tortillas, but put Ka’kat on your radar for later.  I had never heard of ka’kat before, but Dorie says they are a very typical Eastern Mediterranean street food.  You can find them everywhere apparently, just like soft pretzels here in New York.  They’re made with a really straightforward yeast dough.  If you make it in the morning after breakfast, you can easily have fresh, warm bread snacks by lunchtime!

Although this is another recipe in the flatbread section of the book from Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid, my ka’kat (at least) came out round and chubby.  With sesame seeds on top, they did not look unlike mini bagels.  Ka’kat are often flavored with ground mahleb (also mahlab), which are little tiny cherry kernels.  This spice has a bit of that bitter almond flavor and is used in Middle Eastern, Greek and Turkish baking.  You probably won’t find it at your standard grocery store, but you can get it online (at Penzeys, for example) or in a Middle Eastern market.  I found whole seeds at Sahadi’s here in Brooklyn (I love that place!) and ground them to powder in a spice grinder.  All that said, the mahleb is totally optional.  It gives a very subtle aroma and taste, and I always like to buy an interesting new ingredient, but you can leave it out, no probs.

These were so tasty warm and soft from the oven.  I ate four– no kidding!  But they are little, yeah?  I dipped them into olive oil and dukkah (like I did with the Pebble Bread)…they’d be good with salty butter, too.   I made half a recipe and divided the dough into fifteen ka’kat to fit neatly on one sheet tray.  I have about half of them left in the freezer and I’ll definitely warm them up a bit before eating them.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Savory Wheat Crackers

June 3, 2014 at 12:01 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie | 12 Comments
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savory wheat crackers Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid’s Savory Wheat Crackers were a nice little snack to munch on with a chilled glass of wine this past (very fine) weekend.  I’ve made crackers before…here, for instance.  Also, in the restaurants I’ve worked in, pastry always had to make the crackers to go with the cheese plates.  Rolling cracker dough out with a pasta machine (or a sheeter like we had at my first job) is my pro tip from those days.  It gets them super thin, although you have to use a fair amount of flour to not shred the dough in the roller.  I took these to the second thinnest setting in my machine and then topped my crisps with nigella seeds, ground coriander and fleur de sel. This whole wheat cracker dough is super basic….no leavening necessary.  It comes together with a whiz in the food processor, although my dough was a little sticky, so I added some supplemental AP flour to make it behave. The recipe makes a lot of dough…even the half recipe I made yielded tray after tray of crackers!  They have to be rolled, cut and baked in batches.  It was like a Nabisco factory in my kitchen on Sunday.  Actually, I forgot to cut two of the trays before I put them in the oven– I just broke those into big shards after they were cool.  Real Nabisco would so fire me.  You need a ripping hot oven for these and will likely have to tack on a few minutes to the stated baking time. My crackers took 6-7 minutes to bake through, rather than the three minutes in the recipe.  One minute too many, though, and the crackers will be charcoal (and yes, I did torch a tray myself)! I made a little spread out of famer’s cheese and flowering chives to snack on with these crackers.  I have lots more to eat up, so I’ll have to think up some other ideas.  For the cracker recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll

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