TWD BWJ Rewind: Raspberry Swirls

December 29, 2015 at 4:54 pm | Posted in breakfast things, BWJ, cakes & tortes, groups, layer cakes, petit fours, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 7 Comments
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raspberry swirls

Happy New Year, friends!  I want to start 2016 fresh, so it’s time for me to take care of a few pesky things that I’ve left in limbo over the last couple of months.  One is Flo Braker’s Raspberry Swirls recipe, which I actually made along with the group in the fall and then never posted.  This uses a sheet of genoise that’s been cut and coated with raspberry jam and then rolled up jelly-roll style, the jam forming a little red curlicue in the middle. Like Braker’s Miniature Florentine Squares or Glazed Mini-Rounds her Raspberry Swirls are meant to be cut into one or two bite petits fours, but after I rolled them, I decided to leave them more the size of HoHos (or Yodels or Swiss Rolls, depending on your childhood treat preference).  Indeed, these were good…once I glazed them in chocolate and dipped them in coconut and pistachios, they actually reminded me of a rolled up Lamington, an idea I would like to explore further (possibly for Australia Day??).

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll to see if anyone else did a rewind this week, and see the links page from the Raspberry Swirls week a few months ago!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Chocolate-Chestnut Tart with Chestnut-Vanilla Syrup

December 22, 2015 at 10:12 pm | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 14 Comments
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chocolate-chestnut tart

I’ve unfortunately (or maybe not, since I was on vacation) missed the last two TWD postings but I’m hoping to come back strong with this Chocolate-Chestnut Tart.  Don’t let my terrible photo (boo to winter afternoon lighting!) fool you, this tart is darn delicious.  If I were in charge of cooking Christmas dinner, I’d be making it a second time this week.

We’ve used Dorie’s Sweet Tart Dough many times by now, and here it’s filled with candied chestnuts and a rich, truffle-like baked chocolate filling.  The chestnuts are candied during a long, slow poach in vanilla simple syrup.  I was able to easily find vacuum packed chestnuts in a neighborhood gourmet store (I think I’ve even seen them at Trader Joe’s recently).  I candied my entire package, which was more than the recipe called for.  In addition to the sliced chestnuts hiding under the chocolate filling, I decorated the top of the tart with some of the extras, brushed with gold dust for a little holiday bling.  Served with a scoop of ice cream and a drizzle of the awesome reduced chestnut poaching syrup, this was a fine way to end a meal.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.  And happy holidays!!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Camembert in Brioche

December 1, 2015 at 12:01 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 8 Comments
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camembert in brioche

The idea of chesse en croute kind of makes me giggle….seems like something from another dinner party era to me.  I do love a good retro treat though, so I was pretty excited to make Lora Brody’s Camembert (or Brie) in Brioche for Thanksgivng pre-dinner snacks.

The recipe in the book calls for making the brioche dough in a bread machine and caramelizing the onions in a slow cooker, but despite my ever-growing collection of gadgets and small appliances, I don’t have either of those in my kitchen arsenal.  I made the dough in my stand mixer instead (subbing warmed lowfat milk for the milk powder and water), with no problem, and followed the instructions to chill it immediately (without letting it rise first) before shaping.  I caramelized the onions in the oven with some thyme…even though I used small Cipollini onions, they did take a couple of hours, and next time I’ll probably just caramelize regular sliced onions on the stovetop.

I didn’t think we could take down the 9-inch wheel of brie the recipe uses, but I wanted a whole wheel rather than just a wedge, so I found a little 4-inch round of camembert and used that.  I only needed to make 1/3 of the brioche dough and use a few Cipollinis to cover it.  My 6-inch cake pans seemed too big to bake the cheese in, so I did it free-form, rolling the dough out into one round parcel that wrapped up the cheese, and making a little decorative twist out of some trim scrap.  Everything held shape very nicely in the oven, I’m happy to report.  Letting it rest for half an hour or so out of the oven keeps the cheese from being too runny and just spilling out of the crust.

Maybe this isn’t so much something from a bygone era as it is a classic.  Gooey, salty baked cheese, sweet onions and buttery brioche…it’s really so very good.  And quite stunning, too…a perfect holiday appetizer for a crowd.  I even reheated a leftover hunk on Friday, wrapped in foil in a low oven, and it was still just the thing with a glass of wine.

camembert in brioche

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  I do think this is the final recipe in the “Savory Pastries” section of the book….wow!  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Pear-Cranberry Roll-Up Tart

November 24, 2015 at 12:01 am | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 10 Comments
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pear-cranberry roll-up tart

I’ve had my Thanksgiving dessert plotted out for weeks now (predictably, it will be a pumpkin pie), but if I didn’t, I think that this Pear-Cranberry Roll-Up Tart would be making another appearance on Thursday.  Yes, a “roll-up tart”…intriguing, right?  I’ve never made a roll-up tart before.  I imagined forming it would be like making a strudel with pie dough, but actually it was more like rolling up a burrito.

The filling here is made from seasonally appropriate pears– I used Bosc– and cranberries.  I think baked pear desserts are pretty awesome, and the orange and ginger flavorings in this filling really compliment the pears (and the cranberries, too).

The fruit is rolled inside the very same galette dough we used for our Apple Pielettes last month.  I’m big on this dough.  It couldn’t be easier to  handle and it bakes up really flaky (the sanding sugar on top here is a nice sparkly, crispy touch).  Also, it slices cleanly, so you get a good presentation instead of a crumbly mess.  I’ll certainly be trying it out on a regular pie at some point.

pear-cranberry roll-up tart

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.  Happy Thanksgiving!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Parmesan Puffs

November 17, 2015 at 7:32 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie | 3 Comments
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parmesan puffs

It doesn’t matter if I’ve made it myself or if I’ve bought it at the store, I try to never waste a scrap of puff pastry.  So much potential in those little buttery off-cuts…pigs in a blanket, palmiers, Michel Richard’s Parmesan Puffs…I could go on, but let’s focus on the Parm Puffs.  Take your leftover bits of puff, cut them into willy-nilly shapes and fry them up in a bit of oil till they’re puffed and golden.  Then sprinkle them with salt and shower them in good grated parmesan.  Cheesy, buttery and salty– they are the perfect holiday party nibble.  My hostess-with-the-mostess tip of the day: Champagne and fried stuff is a match made in heaven. Continue Reading Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Parmesan Puffs…

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler and a BOOK GIVEAWAY!

November 11, 2015 at 12:01 am | Posted in biscuits & scones, breakfast things, sweet things | 9 Comments
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pear and butterscotch cobbler

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another.  Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.”  When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance.  Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious, and that guy can bake.  His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo.  Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book.  Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am.  After all that practice, now I own those suckers!  I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge.  I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust.  When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough.  He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough,  and now I want to send a copy to one of you!  Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list.  Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6 
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits.  Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one)
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

 tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks.  In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon.  Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes.  Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch.  Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly.  Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books, sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne!  I’ll be in touch soon.***

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Chocolate-Covered Toffee Breakups

November 10, 2015 at 12:01 am | Posted in BCM, candy, groups, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 15 Comments

chocolate-covered toffee breakups

Halloween may have come and gone, but that day’s just the kick-off to candy season, if you ask me.  Now we’re done with the store-bought candy bars and lollies and can move on to some homemade treats, like these Chocolate-Covered Toffee Breakups.  I’ve made caramels and brittles before, but this is the first time I’ve made my own toffee.  It was super simple, but I do think you need a good thermometer for candy making.  I didn’t bother with the buttered parchment setup and flipping the toffee back and forth on cutting boards.  I just lined my baking sheet with a Silpat and I was easily able to lift and flip the cooled toffee.  In fact, I did all the work just on that one sheet.  I also didn’t bother with stirring my nuts into the toffee base before spreading it out.  That was totally a brain fart…I just forgot.  The plus side to that was that my toffee was extremely easy to spread nice and thin. Thinking of my upcoming trip to Sydney (which I will actually be in the middle of by the time this posts), I used macadamia nuts and a flaky Aussie finishing salt to top the chocolate-coated toffee.  I coated the bottom with dark chocolate as well, but let off the salt and nuts so it would sit flat.  It broke easily by hand into nice, clean shards.

There’s something very pleasing about the crunch of toffee.  I like it more than brittle.  These make a great little after dinner nibble, ice cream sundae topping or homemade gift.  For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Hazelnut Baby Loaves

November 3, 2015 at 2:36 pm | Posted in BWJ, cakes & tortes, groups, simple cakes, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 4 Comments
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hazelnut baby loaves

For all the yapping I did last week about wanting my own dessert, I have to admit that I shared one of Johanne Killeen’s individual Hazelnut Baby Cakes.  It wasn’t that I didn’t want a whole little loaf cake all to myself…it’s just that a mini loaf is actually kind of a lot of cake.

These mini loaves were easy to make.  I did take them out of the oven a few minutes before the time noted in the recipe, and I did replace one tablespoon of butter with this lovely hazelnut oil that I bough a while back to use in vinaigrettes and keep forgetting about.  Other than that, I followed the recipe as-is.  I was pleased to use my mini loaf pans, which almost never see the light of day.

The cakes themselves aren’t too sweet, so it’s nice to serve them with a little something.  In addition to the suggested mascarpone-whipped cream (sans grappa, thank you), we had our baby cakes with poached pear slices and candied hazelnuts.  Speaking of that cream, after I made my husband a birthday cannoli cake a few months ago and frosted it with mascarpone whipped cream,  I decided that adding a nice blob of mascarpone is the best way to stabilize whipped cream.  It’s light, tastes delicious and holds up perfectly for a few days.  I highly recommend.

hazelnut baby loaves

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  There’s also a video of the TV episode.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Apple Pielettes

October 27, 2015 at 7:00 am | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 21 Comments
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apple pielettes

Sometimes I just don’t want to share a dessert.  When I want my very own cake, I have a cupcake.  When I want a pie all to myself–let’s not talk about the time I ate an entire Mrs. Smith’s for dinner–  these Apple Pielettes, made in a muffin tin, will fit the bill nicely.

This recipe uses Dorie’s galette dough.  I don’t think we’ve made it before, but it was easy to do in the food processor and easy to work with. Remembering the kuchen from a few weeks ago, I was mentally prepared to be annoyed fitting the dough into cavities of the muffin tin, but this was actually no problem at all (although you’ll probably find that you need to cut your dough circles slightly larger than the recipe states if you really want to fill the tins).  The dough baked flaky and crisp…I’d use it for big-girl pies, too.

The filling is nice, with apple, of course, (which I didn’t bother to peel) and flavors from dried apricots, raisins and a bit of orange marmalade.  If you are an all-American apple pie purist, I’m sure you could fiddle with the insides to get just what you want.  After all, it’s your very own pie.

apple pielettes

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Tiger Cakes

October 13, 2015 at 6:10 pm | Posted in BCM, cakes & tortes, groups, simple cakes, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 22 Comments
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tiger cakes

I first had a Tiger Cake a couple of years ago at a beautiful bakery in Montreal, but I had no idea what it was called.  I don’t think there was a sign and I just pointed to it and I took it to-go.  When I ate it I thought it was so delicious– moist and chewy with ganache in the center– that I kicked myself for not having gotten its name.  I could tell that it had almond flour in it and its texture seemed like a financier, so I immediately Googled around in English and French (it’s limited, but thanks to my fluent mother, I can speak some– especially food words!).  I found exactly what I was looking for on several French sites, les tigrés au chocolat.  Although I once posted about a tiger cake, it was a very different animal, and I never did make les tigrés at home.  I didn’t forget about them, though, and was delighted to see a recipe for Tiger Cakes in Baking Chez Moi.  I have nominated the recipe several for TWD times now, and I am really glad that its time has come!

This batter is a lot like a financier, or maybe more like a friand, with melted butter and egg whites.  It stirs together in just a few seconds.  Dorie’s recipe has finely chopped chocolate mixed into the batter to give the tiger cakes their stripes, but a bunch of those French recipes I saw called for chocolate vermicelli instead.  Makes sense to me…jimmies do look like stripes.  I have a box of nice Dutch dark chocolate ones, so I went ahead and used them (and also saved the trouble of chopping up chocolate into tiny flecks).  I just eyeballed the amount.  Some folks had trouble getting their baked tigers out of the tin, and recommended greasing well.  My mini muffin mold is non-stick and has only been used a couple of times so it’s still pretty slick.  I used a bit of spray for added insurance and I didn’t have any sticking issues.  The ganache on top isn’t strictly necessary, but it sure is good.

These were great…just what I remember from Montreal.  Cute, too.  I will definitely repeat this one.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

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