Everyday Dorie: Chicken and Beer Stew

March 25, 2022 at 5:27 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, other savory, savory things, soups | 4 Comments
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chicken and beer stew

This Chicken and Beer Stew is really supposed to be Beef and Beer Stew, but as I don’t eat read meat, I made some mods so I could try it, too. I actually nominated it for this month, thinking it would be good for St. Paddy’s day, when really it’s based on a Flemish carbonnade. I’m all over the place.

I swapped boneless, skinless chicken thighs, turkey bacon and chicken stock for the other meaty stuff, but followed all the flavorings (spices, mustard, a bit of brown sugar, dark Belgian ale, etc) and flavor-building steps (browning the meat, caramelizing the onions forever, etc) Dorie had listed. I did not, however do the multi-hour oven braise for my dish, because I knew the chicken thighs didn’t need that. I just kept everything on the stove-top for cooking. Following Dorie’s “chockful of vegetables” suggestion, I added in some carrot and baby potato chunks, and let everything low-bubble braise on the stove for 30-45 mins. When the saucy stuff was reduced a bit and everything else was tender and stewed, I called it done. Well, almost. My stew was kind of pale in comparison to the dark color of a beef one. I stirred in a dash of super-dark mushroom soy sauce, my secret ingredient for boosting color and umami when I am doing red to white meat replacements.

The weather is always up and down here in March, but the past several days have been chilly, so it was a nice cozy dinner for last night. I didn’t bother to cook noodles as Dorie suggests, since I had those potatoes in my stew. I like the little bit of sweetness the dish has, but I did save adding the splash of cider vinegar to the pot until after it was off the heat, so it would cut that and brighten the flavors up a bit. I’m looking forward to round two tonight, as stuff like this usually gets better the next day.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

Everyday Dorie: Carrot-and-Mustard Rillettes

March 25, 2022 at 2:46 am | Posted in condiments, cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, other savory, salads, savory things, veggies | 6 Comments
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carrot-and-mustard rillettes

Carrot-and-Mustard Rillettes…hmmm…one of the stranger “things on toast” I’ve made. Rillettes are shredded meat confit, but there’s no meat to be found here. Instead we have toasted bread, spread with a Dijonnaise-type mix and topped with steamed carrots and Comté cheese cubes that have been tossed in more even mustard and some spices.

Strange, but good, and with just enough pungent mustardy heat to make you pay attention when you take a bite. I used some homemade sourdough and drizzled the assembled toasts with the good olive oil and then put on a floof of micro greens. A little, messy, but it was a nice change-up from the kale salads I make for lunch several times a week. Carrot toast may become a repeat thing around here.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see what we all thought.

Tuesdays with Dorie DC: Cocoa-Cayenne Cookies

March 1, 2022 at 12:01 am | Posted in cookies & bars, DC, groups, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie | 7 Comments
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cocoa-cayenne cookies

We find ourselves today in the Cocktail Cookies section of the book. We only have one savory cookie left after this! Dorie created these Cocoa-Cayenne Cookies to go with red wine. They are barely sweet, have a bit of a kick and a very tender crumb. I think I rolled mine a tad too thin, as a couple of them crumbled to bits when I moved them around. That’s our secret because I ate the bits. It’s almost a mind trick to bite into one of these cookies and get the spice of chili powder and the bitterness of cocoa, rather than the chocolatey sweetness you’d expect by looking at them. They do, in fact, go well with red wine, so maybe the real trick is to just pour another glass.

For the recipe, see Dorie’s Cookies by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll and please join us anytime!

Everyday Dorie: Pasta with Sardines, Fennel and Walnuts

February 11, 2022 at 5:15 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, pasta, savory things | 4 Comments
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pasta with sardines, fennel and walnuts

The thing about fishy-fish like sardines is that people either love ’em or hate ’em. I’m a lover, so sign me up for a big bowl of Pasta with Sardines, Fennel and Walnuts (or pine nuts, if you are sticking faithfully to the recipe). This very classic Sicilian dish also has capers, raisins, tomatoes and lemon in the mix. Although my husband is half Sicilian, the love of sardines doesn’t swim though his blood, so I made this one all for myself. I splurged on a fancier jar of olive oil-packed sardines because I wanted to use that oil in the saucy stuff that coated the pasta. The dish is salty, briny, oily, sweet, and acidic all at once. There is a lot going on, but to me, it all works so well. I have half a jar of sardines left, so I’m going to try another version of this recipe later in the week.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Tuesdays with Dorie BWD: Whip-It-Up-Quick Cornbread

February 8, 2022 at 1:30 pm | Posted in breakfast things, BWD, groups, other savory, quick breads, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie | 4 Comments
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whip-it-up-quick cornbread

Seems like I’m always looking for something to go with a pot of chili this time of year, and I think I’ve found it with this Whip-It-Up-Quick Cornbread. A buttermilk cornbread you can bake right in a skillet, this one really does come together in a jiffy, and it has a plush, moist crumb. One of the best I’ve made. You can leave it plain or go wild with your fave add-ins. I used some hot pepper flakes, chives and a bit of white cheddar.

If you don’t have the book Baking with Dorie: Sweet, Salty & Simple by Dorie Greenspan, get it and join us as we bake through it every second and fourth Tuesdays! Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll and all the other participation deets over on Tuesdays with Dorie!

Everyday Dorie: Cauliflower Tabbouleh

January 28, 2022 at 5:44 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, salads, savory things, veggies | 3 Comments
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cauliflower tabbouleh

Cauliflower– it’s so hot right now. Turns out that something once viewed as boring, pale and bland has the “caulipower” to transform itself into pizza crust, rice, tots, and a cream sauce substitute. No longer do we over-steam and under-season hacked up crumbly florets and toss them in melted butter so we can sadly choke them down; we gleefully and wildly slather cauliflower with every spice and paste we can get our hands on and roast it whole (one of my favorite ways to prepare it, btw) or deep fry it in nugget-form and drench it in delicious sauce. We even eat the leaves, which just a few years ago were generally regarded as trash. And now we make Cauliflower Tabbouleh out of it! I joke. I eat tons of cauliflower, and have nothing but supreme veggie respect for it. In fact, two weeks ago I got my teeth whitened and it sustained me for four days in a row, in the forms of pureed cauliflower-potato soup and cauliflower cheese pasta.

Back to the matter at hand…when I think of tabbouleh, I think of a salad that’s very heavy on the chopped herbs, with a little tomato and bulgur mixed through. An herb salad really, rather than a grain salad. This one of Dorie’s is definitely cauliflower-based– the cauliflower this time standing in for bulgur– but there’s room to mess around with ratios, mix-ins and seasonings if you’d like. I stuck pretty much to Dorie’s suggestion of chickpeas, raisins, almonds, mint and parsley mixed into grated cauliflower and tossed up in a lemony dressing. I made a nice big bowl of the stuff, and it was a good lunch for a couple of days.

Dorie recommends tasting the salad after it’s assembled to adjust the seasoning and then letting the salad sit for an hour or more before plating it up. I tasted mine yet again after it rested, as I find I usually like a little fresh lemon squeeze and olive oil drizzle right before serving.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see what we all thought.

Everyday Dorie: Stuffed Cabbage

January 14, 2022 at 12:01 am | Posted in breakfast things, cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, other savory, savory things, veggies | 2 Comments
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stuffed cabbage

Stuffed Cabbage is a recipe that might be more appropriate for a book called All Day Dorie than Everyday Dorie. Never mind the three hours of cooking time (hands-off, in the oven, no big deal), I think I probably spent close to two hours assembling the dish. No joke, I had to take a coffee break in the middle of it. But that’s ok– I did it on a cold, grey weekend day when I didn’t want to leave the house and was up for a kitchen project. 

I’d never made stuffed cabbage rolls before. I don’t eat ground beef or pork sausage, so I swapped these filling meats for ground chicken and turkey sausage. I couldn’t see how I could successfully get the cabbage leaves off the head in one untattered piece without blanching the whole head, so I just did that, rather than blanch the individual leaves as Dorie instructs. It was a process of removing a few leaves at a time and re-dipping the head in water to easily peel off the next layer, and I do have some leftover blanched cabbage still on the head, but I’ll use that in a soup or make okonomiyaki with it this week. I was able to fill and roll the leaves pretty easily and I skipped the step of securing them each with a toothpick. They were fine.

For the tomato sauce, I didn’t pay attention (i.e., I totally didn’t tread the instructions first) to the fact that the ingredients were supposed to go into the Dutch oven in layers along with the assembled rolls. Instead, everything for the sauce went into the pot at once and I snuggled all the rolls down into the mix. I was kind of irritated with myself, but figured that the cook time was so long that all would be fine. And it was! These are a delicious winter dinner (or a few dinners–even a half-batch was a big batch). I didn’t really know what to serve the cabbage rolls with, as they’re kind of complete on their own, with a meat and rice filling, veggies and a sauce.  I just went with a little cucumber and sour cream salad and sprinkled some crispy fried onions on top. I also meant to sprinkle the rolls with parsley, but after all that time putting them together, I completely forgot.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWD: Cheese Puffers

December 28, 2021 at 10:25 pm | Posted in breakfast things, BWD, groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 6 Comments
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cheese puffers

I’ve never really thought about what would happen if a muffin and a popover had a baby, but apparently it would be a Cheese Puffer. Made like a popover that’s baked in a muffin tin, these are heavy on the cheddar cheese. I guess that cheddar-weight is why they don’t really “popover,” but they are custardy, with melty cheese pockets (I used my favorite Trader Joe’s Unexpected Cheddar) and bits of chopped scallion on the inside, and a beautiful golden brown crust. I scaled back the recipe to just get these four…two were had with chili one night, and the other two with eggs in the morning.

If you don’t have the book Baking with Dorie: Sweet, Salty & Simple by Dorie Greenspan, get it and join us as we bake through it every second and fourth Tuesdays! Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll and all the other participation deets over on Tuesdays with Dorie!

Everyday Dorie: Spatchcocked Chicken

December 24, 2021 at 3:09 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, other savory, savory things | 1 Comment
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spatchcocked chicken

It’s been a while since I’ve cooked a whole bird, but this Spatchcocked Chicken was a good excuse to haul out the roasting pan. Spatchcocking is a technique that involves cutting out the chicken’s backbone and flattening down the breastbone a bit so it roasts more evenly and quickly. I’m not the most nimble butcher, but it’s not really too gruesome a task (I used heavy kitchen shears to get the job done), and you can save that backbone to add to your future stockpot. Dorie had us rub up the chicken with butter and Middle Eastern spices (although you can take the flavorings whichever way you choose) and add some veggies to the pan before it all went in the oven. It came out pretty seductively bronzed and moist, and was a good reminder to make a roast chicken dinner more often.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

Tuesdays with Dorie DC: Hot-and-Spicy Togarashi Meringues

December 21, 2021 at 10:01 pm | Posted in cookies & bars, DC, groups, savory things, snacks, tuesdays with dorie | 3 Comments
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hot-and-spicy togarashi meringues

It’s been a while since we’ve done a savory “cocktail cookie,” and these Hot-and-Spicy Togarashi Meringues sound like just the thing to pair with a frosty beer or cup of sake on ramen night. A little sweet and a little spicy, these meringues are flavored with shichimi togarashi, a ground chili pepper sprinkle mix that also includes sesame seeds, orange peel and seaweed. I have a little jar of straight-up togarashi powder, meaning it’s not the blend, just the ground chili pepper. It packs a pretty big heat punch, but I’m still on condiment lock-down at home and far too lazy to get out my spice grinder to pulverize the missing ingredients myself, so I just went with it.

I had a vision of making my meringues into Ottolenghi-like swoopy poofs, so I scooped them nice and big, rather than piping out small kisses. They totally went flat in the oven! I don’t know what that was all about, although I have to say, I think the ones in the book photo also look a bit “settled.” Although they tasted fine, dissolving away while leaving a burn, I was pretty disappointed in their looks. I still used them as part of a little snack spread for a Japanese-themed happy hour at home, and that was fun, but I’m not sure I’d make these again. If I do, I’ll try using a Swiss or Italian meringue and see if I get a puffier baked result.

For the recipe, see Dorie’s Cookies by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here). Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll and please join us anytime!

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