Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Danish Pastry Pockets

May 3, 2016 at 5:16 pm | Posted in breakfast things, groups, sweet things, sweet yeast breads, tuesdays with dorie | 3 Comments
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danish pastry pockets

I’ve made Beatrice Ojakangas’s Danish recipe here once before, when we formed it into an impressive braid.  Her dough uses a “quick” method, employing the food processor to break down the butter into chunks in the flour, rather than folding a butter block into a dough.  The rough dough does need to rest in the fridge overnight, but after that, all of the lamination work is done quickly and at once, without any waiting in between the turns and folds.  Pretty easy, all things considered, and crisp and flaky, too.

There are a variety of little shapes you can form Danish dough into, but I only did the “spandauer,” mostly because it has the coolest name.  It’s just a square folded up around a filling like a baby in a papoose.  I didn’t feel like trying to hard on those fillings.  I thought for all of two seconds about making a pastry cream, before remembering I had some ricotta cheese in the fridge.  I drained it for a couple of hours before stirring in a bit of sugar, lemon zest and egg yolk.  I topped that off with some rhubarb jam.  After the Danishes were out of the oven they got a good squiggling of glaze.  These were quite delicious, and would have no doubt been amazing with coffee for breakfast, but we actually had them for dessert.  Good anytime of day– that’s what I’m sayin’!

Back when we did that braid, I also tried out my shaping skills on the pinwheel.  That one was filled with cream cheese and blueberry jam and sprinkled with pearl sugar.  And glazed, too, of course.

danish pinwheel

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  There’s even a video of Beatrice and Julia making Danish together. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Jammer Galette

April 26, 2016 at 10:00 am | Posted in BCM, groups, pies & tarts, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 13 Comments
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jammer galette

Sometimes there just isn’t any good fruit around to make a pie.  Where I live right now, I can get some really old apples or some really green rhubarb at the farmers’ market.  We’re in the in-between season.  That’s when jam tarts come in handy, like the Jammer Galette.  This is a full-size version of Dorie’s Jammer cookies–a short and sandy sablé crust, topped with jam and covered in a sweet streusel.  I’m often taking a large version of something and scaling it down to a smaller size, but the little Jammer really does scale up well.

We’ve used Dorie’s sweet tart and galette doughs in the past, and I have a piece of each in the freezer.  I was tempted to cheat and swap one of them here, but I stayed true and made the sablé.  I had some homemade rhubarb jam from last summer in the fridge and I used it up here to make room for this year’s coming preserves stash.  This galette is pretty easy to make…the crust and and streusel can be taken care of in advance, and of course you can buy a nice jam for this.  It’s slim and bakes up crisp and delicate, and, naturally, it’s fabulous with vanilla ice cream.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Chocolate-Cinnamon Beignets

April 19, 2016 at 8:18 pm | Posted in general pastry, groups, other sweet, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 6 Comments
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chocolate-cinnamon beignets

Normally when I think beignet, I just think donut…well, French donut, I guess.  Something made with a donut-like dough.  Usually involving yeast.  It turns out there’s another type of beignet that I wasn’t really aware of…one made with fried pâte à choux dough, and Norman Love’s Chocolate-Cinnamon Beignets are an example.  These ones have cocoa and cinnamon flavoring the choux dough and a filling of caramelized banana pastry cream.  Yeah, there are a a bunch of things to make, but mmmmm.

Assembling these beignets is a lot like forming dumplings or ravioli.  The choux dough is wrapped and chilled, before being rolled, cut and filled.  And then folded, crimped, frozen and fried.  I’ve never rolled out choux dough before, so this was a fun exercise.  I could have cut the dough into circles like in the recipe (and made half-moons), but I cut it into squares instead (and made triangles) so I wouldn’t have any scraps to waste or otherwise deal with.  Different geometry, but it all tastes the same.

These are best served à la minute, right when they’re fried crisp and the filling is warm.  The recipe calls for serving the beignets with a sweet walnut and cream sauce, which I’m sure is delicious, but I had some chocolate-tahini sauce I made the other week and I used that instead. I added a scoop of vanilla ice cream and some sliced bananas, just because.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  There’s also a video of Norman and Julia making the beignets together.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Persian Naan

April 5, 2016 at 12:02 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 8 Comments
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persian naan

This Persian Naan flatbread from Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid uses the very same dough as the Oasis Naan we did almost four years (what the –??) ago.  So I’ve kinda done this one before, but it’s been a while.  The dough is actually as simple as it gets– water, flour, yeast and salt.  One proof, then shape and bake. The book instructions call for making it by hand…last time I used the food processor…this time I used the KitchenAid…do what you like and rest assured that it will all be good.

The dough bakes up nice and puffy and chewy.  It didn’t brown so well on top, so I brushed a little melted butter on at the halfway point and gave the naan an extra couple of minutes in the oven to get a bit of golden spotting.  This was a nice bread to have with our Sunday morning fried eggs and avocado.  It kind of reminds me of the grocery store Turkish pide bread that I fell in love with when we lived in Oz, but can’t get here.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  There’s also a video of Alford, Duguid and Julia making the bread together, and the authors wrote this article that gives more naan tips.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

TWD BWJ Rewind: Pain de Campagne

March 29, 2016 at 8:21 pm | Posted in groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 7 Comments
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pain de campagne

Joe Ortiz’s Pain de Campagne is my first home sourdough bread experiment.  A whole wheat starter (called “the chef”) is refreshed over a period of several days, hopefully collecting wild yeast from the air in the meantime.  There’s a warning in the recipe intro that you might get a flat loaf– no guarantees in the world of wild yeast.  I could see the change in my starter over the week and I definitely noticed it’s sour smell increasing, so I had some hope for it, at least.

After almost four days, the final dough is ready to be mixed and later shaped.  My bread definitely rose and had a nice shape but it’s quite dense inside.  I didn’t really get any large air holes in the crumb and I see that I need to work on my slashing skills.  Still makes good, flavorful toast though, with a nice crust, and it won’t go to waste.  

pain de campagne

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll to see if anyone else did a rewind this week!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Matcha Financiers and Tiger Cakes

March 22, 2016 at 8:28 pm | Posted in BCM, cakes & tortes, groups, simple cakes, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 3 Comments
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matcha financiers and tiger cakes

Green cakes!  Icky or intriguing?  They may be the color of Frankenstein, but don’t worry.  It’s nothing weird…Japanese matcha tea powder gives these financiers a greenish tinge.  I’m used to the slightly grassy taste of matcha tea and I’ve made cake and frostings with it before.  I think it’s a nice flavor addition to a traditional almond financier.  Thinking back to those Tiger Cakes I liked so much a few months ago, I followed Dorie’s Bonne Idee suggestion and turned about half of my batter into matcha tigers with a generous sprinkling of some Dutch dark chocolate vermicelli.  These are really good just warm, I think, and I like the way the edge bits get a little crispy.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Odile’s Fresh Orange Cake

March 8, 2016 at 8:46 am | Posted in BCM, cakes & tortes, groups, simple cakes, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 13 Comments
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odile's fresh orange cake

Odile’s Fresh Orange Cake is the second bright and easy citrus cake we’ve made recently…the Fluted Carrot-Tangerine Cake was a hit in my house back in January.  This cake is a super-cinch to make and the batter is flavored with orange zest and juice.  I made half a recipe in a 6-inch pan.  After it’s baked, it’s doused in a simple syrup of OJ and sugar.  You can use as much of the syrup as you want….go for broke if you like a wetter texture.

You can take that one step further and poach cross-cut orange slices in the syrup.  Then you can decorate the top of the cake with a mosaic of beautiful orange pinwheels.  I would have done that, but knew I’d be putting half the cake into the freezer, so I just tossed some segments in the syrup and decorated each slice with a few of them instead.  The slices I froze were later spooned over with some candied kumquat slices–so tasty!!

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Chocolate Ruffle Cake

February 23, 2016 at 7:33 pm | Posted in cakes & tortes, groups, layer cakes, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 20 Comments
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chocolate ruffle cake

I know that I’m a week off with this one, but it took some extra time for me to get motivated to make Alice Medrich’s Chocolate Ruffle Cake from Baking with Julia.  Maybe I’ll get to that Hot Chocolate Panna Cotta from Baking Chez Moi for a rewind week.  I had my hands full with this one, what with making a genoise, a cake filling and all kinds of chocolate deco work.  It is impressive, though, with its beautiful ruffly top and sharp chocolate band.  This cake could easily be spread out as a weekend project, although once I did get off my duff, I just charged through it.

I was only making this cake for the two of us so I downsized the recipe by half to fit into a 6-inch pan.  Since the cake was smaller, I figured I could get away with slicing it into just two layers instead of three.  I like when one bit of simplification leads to another, and with only two layers to sandwich, I skipped the chocolate cream filling layer in favor of just plain cream.  Oh, and instead of using whipped creme fraiche as my filling and topping, I used whipped cream stabilized with a nice blob of mascarpone (so tasty!).  I only did this because wanted it to hold up for a few days…even a 6-inch cake takes us a while to eat up.  Also rather than fresh (winter) raspberries in the filling, I used some booze-preserved cherries that I jarred over the summer, and the cherry booze liquid became my soaking syrup for the cake.  Sounds like I made a lot of changes, but really, they were pretty minor tweaks.  Dorie says in to recipe intro that we can think of this cake as a variable format rather than a precise formula, so I felt free to do so.  Anyway, it’s delicious– I basically turned it into a Black Forest cake.

The chocolate work can seem intimidating, and I can hardly describe the process myself, so if the book’s instructions aren’t clear, these videos of the TV episode are really helpful.  No tempering is involved, so it’s really not that bad, even if it does take a few practice swipes get get nice ruffles.  Mine weren’t perfect– and I’m the “chocolatier” (it is embarrassing for me to say that!) at the restaurant I work for– but they were good enough to make a lovely, swirly-twirly arrangement on top of the cake.

chocolate ruffle cake

If you’re up for a weekend challenge, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan for the recipe.  There are also a couple of videos of Alice and Julia making the cake together.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of this week’s TWD Blogroll!  

Tuesdays with Dorie BCM: Soft-Centered Chocolate Teacup Cakes

February 9, 2016 at 12:01 am | Posted in BCM, cakes & tortes, groups, simple cakes, sweet things, tuesdays with dorie | 16 Comments
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soft-centered chocolate teacup cakes

These Soft-Centered Chocolate Teacup Cakes are rich, delicious and easy to make.  Kind of a dangerous combination!  They are a take on molten chocolate cake…an almost flourless and uber-chocolatey cake with more gooey, melting chocolate bits hiding in the middle.

They’re hardly more difficult to make than brownies, although you have to whip eggs and sugar until ribbony, so using a stand mixer is a good idea.  The batter is divided among teacups or ramekins, which are half-filled, sprinkled with chopped chocolate and then topped off.  I have quite a collection of teacups for some reason (reason actually being that they are cute!).  I can see these making an adorable dinner party dessert served in mismatched cups.  I didn’t get a photo of the insides for you, but you can see here that they’re schlumping a bit in the middle…that’s how you can tell they have soft centers.  That dip also makes a perfect landing spot for a bit of whipped cream or ice cream.

For the recipe, see Baking Chez Moi by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Buttermilk Bread

February 2, 2016 at 12:01 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, yeast breads | 13 Comments
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buttermilk bread

Lora Brody’s Buttermilk Bread is one I’ve been wanting to make for a while now.  Sounds simple and homey and a nice thing to bake on a cold day.

The recipe in the book calls for making the bread dough in a bread machine, which I don’t have, so I made it in my stand mixer instead.  I  swapped a 50/50 water/liquid buttermilk combo for the water/powdered buttermilk in the recipe.  While I used the full 2 1/2 teaspoons of yeast, I think I could have gotten away with just 2 teaspoons. I basically followed the mixing instructions we used when we did the White Loaves years ago, since they seemed pretty standard for this type of bread.  I then switched back to Brody’s instructions for rising and baking.

This made a nice sandwich loaf, and maybe next time I’ll try it in the cloverleaf roll variation.  The bread has maple syrup in the dough, so there’s a hint of sweetness there, and I think the crust is really good (I’m the weirdo who likes the end pieces).  I’m looking forward to pulling slices from the freezer for grilled cheese!

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan. Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll.

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