Everyday Dorie: So-Good Miso Corn

September 11, 2020 at 7:44 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, veggies | 5 Comments
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so-good miso corn

In peak corn season, I’m always looking for fun things to do with the ears I bring home from the market. This So-Good Miso Corn went over well here, especially with the guy in the house who prefers his corn to be cut from the cob. Fresh kernels are sautéed with butter and miso and sprinkled with za’atar and cayenne. On paper, it kind of seems like a mash-up of flavors, but I used a very light miso and it all worked nicely. Dorie suggests a variation with seared squid to make it into more of a main course…while I wanted to keep the corn as a side dish, she did spark an idea. I have a packet of dried shredded squid, a sweet and savory snack that I got at a local Japanese market, and put a little floof of it on top of the corn.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see all of our beet bowls this week.

Everyday Dorie: Ginger-Beet Salad Bowls

July 24, 2020 at 9:12 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, salads, savory things | 6 Comments
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ginger-beet salad bowls

Oops- I almost forgot about this posting, but luckily I made my Ginger-Beet Salad Bowls a while back, so my photos and my thoughts were ready to go. It was a recipe I jumped the gun on last year, but I should make this cooked beet salad again because I really liked it, and also because the beets are looking pretty sweet at the greenmarket right now. I actually make a lot of composed salad “bowls” all year round. If I have a bit of leftover roasted or steamed veggies from dinner, they find their way into my lunch salad the next day. When I cook quinoa or brown rice, I always make double to keep for the rest of the week. I have a tough crowd here, but I can even get away with salad bowls for dinner if I have a bit of protein to add to the veg and grains.

I really like/need interesting ideas for vinaigrette, and this one’s spiced with ginger and harissa and is sweetened with honey. I have to admit though that it is apparently impossible for me to measure out anything for a salad dressing. I eyeball, I substitute and I adjust according to what I have and what I want the dressing to taste like. This one, for example, calls for both white wine and white balsamic vinegars. I will probably never buy white balsamic vin, so I went with all white wine here, and the flavorings I did to taste. So I guess I’m saying that I don’t know how Dorie’s dressing tastes as written, but I liked what I made using it as a guideline!

I steamed red, yellow and pink beets and added them along with radicchio to quinoa mixed with pomegranate seeds (aka rubies), scallions and herbs. There’s a swoop of Greek yogurt in the bowl, too, and spoonfuls of dressing drizzled about….a very good summer lunch.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see all of our beet bowls this week.

Everyday Dorie: Summer Vegetable Tian

June 26, 2020 at 4:46 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, veggies | 3 Comments
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summer vegetable tian

My neighborhood greenmarket is rockin’ right now (in a very safe and socially distant way, of course), and it was easy to get everything I needed for this Summer Vegetable Tian. A tian is a lot like ratatouille, with layers of tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini and red onion soaking up garlic, thyme and EVOO. You bake the heck out this until the veggies collapse into squishy, olive oily goodness. Dorie says it’s borderline vegetable jam. And seriously, don’t skimp on the oil– just mop it up with a piece of nice bread.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here), and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see all the tians the group made this week.

Everyday Dorie: Sweet and Smoky Roasted Carrots

December 27, 2019 at 9:12 am | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, veggies | 4 Comments
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sweet and smoky roasted carrots

I’m always looking for easy and tasty side dishes to go along with something simple like roasted chicken thighs. Turn the oven on and I’m basically done with dinner. Haha. These Sweet and Smoky Roasted Carrots fit that bill nicely. Take carrots, toss them in a smoky-spicy cider vin dressing with paprika, cumin, cayenne and a drizzle of honey. Roast ’em up and pile them on a plate with a swoop of Greek yogurt and any extra dressing. Veggies and sauce all set!

These carrots would make a great side dish, but this batch I had for lunch. My greenmarket had some small rainbow carrots and I thought they’d be cute and colorful here. I sprinkled them with some smoked almonds (which I’m kind of addicted to) for a bit of extra toasty oomph. Something I really like about this recipe is that you can take the technique and play around with the dressing ingredients/flavorings to suit your tastes or to suit your particular meal.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here), and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Everyday Dorie: Potato Chowder Lots of Ways

January 11, 2019 at 3:15 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, soups, veggies | 13 Comments
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potato chowder lots of ways

Well, it’s officially frigid here and all I want to make for dinner is soup. Luckily, Cook the Book Fridays picked Dorie’s Potato Chowder Lots of Ways for the recipe of the month. I like the “lots of ways” bit because it pretty much tells me I’ll have room to improvise, which I usually do anyway but having permission is a refreshing change. Hahaha. I actually didn’t really veer too far off base here, just a few tweaks and some flavoring and topping customization. This is really a potato and onion chowder, using just about every allium you can think of: yellow onions, leeks, shallots and garlic. Any not on this list can be added as a topping. I first pre-crisped some turkey bacon bits in my Dutch oven and set them aside for garnish. As the alliums cooked down all soft and sweet, I seasoned them with Old Bay. My dad used to have a boat on the Chesapeake, so I love that stuff. I never peel potatoes if I don’t have to, and didn’t see a reason to here, so I left the skins on mine.

I don’t always love how I feel after eating soup with a cream base, so I skipped the cream here and instead stole a couple of ladlefuls of soup out of my pot (the liquid with some potatoes and onions) and whizzed it really smooth in my blender. I stirred that back into the soup to give the base a thicker, velvety texture and then added about 1/4 cup of 2% milk just to give it a slightly lighter, more chowdery, color. Because I’d been restrained with the dairy in the soup, I felt no guilt when adding a blop of crème fraîche as a topping. Also on top of the “my way” chowder, I sprinkled those bacon bits, some sliced scallion and some tiny potatoes that I crisped up in olive oil, crouton-style. Delicious. I will definitely try this chowder other ways as the season goes on.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Everyday Dorie: Roasted Squash Hummus

December 14, 2018 at 10:21 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, snacks, veggies | 14 Comments
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roasted squash hummus

You know I’m having an exciting Friday night when I’m writing up a blog post about hummus! At least this Roasted Squash Hummus has a little something different going on. In place of the traditional chickpeas, this hummus gets its body from a roasted squash. Of course there’s tahini and lemon, but also some cool ingredients like za’atar and pomegranate molasses. I used a small carnival squash, and although Dorie just has you mash together the ingredients with a fork, I put everything into my mini food processor and gave it a whiz. I plated it up with a smear of thick yogurt, drizzles of olive oil and more pom molasses and a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds. It’s earthy and creamy with a touch of sweetness. This was more interesting than my normal Sunday football food, and I thought it made a nice dip for veggies and pita chips.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Everyday Dorie: Maple-Syrup-and-Mustard Brussels Sprouts

November 9, 2018 at 12:01 am | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, veggies | 19 Comments
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maple-syrup-and-mustard brussels sprouts

I was never the kid who pushed away the dish of brussels sprouts. In fact, they were always a highlight of Thanksgiving dinner, right up there with stuffing! I know…weird, right? When I make sprouts at home, I usually just simply roast them with a little s&p. Sometimes I shred and sauté them. I’m always happy to try out something new, though. These Maple-Syrup-and-Mustard Brussels Sprouts are steamed first and then they’re finished off in a skillet, where they take on some color before being combined with the maple and mustard and some crispy bacon (of the turkey variety for me). They’re sweet and savory and a little zingy. And steaming is a really easy way to cook them, so I don’t know why I haven’t done it before. I have a little container of leftovers that I plan to heat up and top with a fried egg, and I’m so looking forward to it!

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Capers and Lemony Browned Butter

November 22, 2011 at 6:46 pm | Posted in savory things, veggies | 4 Comments
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roasted Brussels sprouts with capers and lemony browned butter

I was never the kid who picked her Brussels sprouts off the plate and threw them across the room.  Nope, I’ve always liked them (bite-sized cabbages are cool!), and since in my house they’re not just a once-a-year neglected side dish, I’m always on the hunt for fun ways to fix them.  Roasting is one of my favorite techniques to prepare sprouts…mostly because you can just toss them in the oven and basically leave them be while you focus on other things, but also because you get a combo of tender spouts and crunchy stray leaves.  A new book that I’ve really been enjoying called All About Roasting: A New Approach to a Classic Art by Molly Stevens shows a new twist on roasted sprouts by tossing them in a dressing of brown butter, lemon juice and capers.  I’ve apparently been on a brown butter kick lately, but it really does add a nutty flavor that makes things extra-special.  The lemon juice and capers add a bright acidic pop to the little-bitty cabbages.  I gave this recipe a trial run a couple of weeks ago, and liked it so much that I’m making it again for Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday.

Happy Thanksgiving!  And no pie until you finish your sprouts!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Capers and Lemony Browned Butter— makes four servings
adapted from All About Roasting: A New Approach to a Classic Art by Molly Stevens

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon mustard seeds, yellow or brown
2 tablespoons capers, drained
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice, plus more if needed

– Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat to 425 degrees (400 degrees convection). If desired, line a heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

– Depending on their size, cut the Brussels sprouts in halves or quarters; you want them to be small enough to be bite-sized. Place in a large bowl and toss with the olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. Arrange the sprouts in a single layer on the baking sheet. Don’t worry if some of the leaves fall off. Include these when roasting; they will crisp up, adding a nice crunch to the dish.

– Slide the Brussels sprouts into the oven and roast, turning once or twice with a metal spatula to promote even cooking, until the sprouts are tender throughout and smaller bits or leaves that have fallen off are browned and crunchy, 20 to 25 minutes. Test for doneness by piercing a sprout with the tip of a paring knife, but to be sure, nab one off the baking sheet, let it cool slightly, and taste; it should be tender and sweet.

– As the sprouts roast, melt the butter in a small skillet or heavy saucepan (it should be no more than 6 inches across or the butter will burn). Cook over medium heat until the butter is melted. Add the mustard seeds, increase the heat to medium-high, and cook, watching the pan carefully and swirling frequently, until the butter begins to foam and turns golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add the capers and lemon juice — the butter will sizzle — and immediately remove from the heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste and keep warm until the Brussels sprouts are ready.

– Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a serving dish and add the browned butter. Toss to coat. Taste for salt, pepper, and lemon and serve immediately.

Please note that the publisher, W.W. Norton, sent me a copy of this book.

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