Everyday Dorie: Fresh-Off-The Cob Corn Chowder

August 9, 2019 at 7:16 am | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, soups, veggies | 13 Comments
Tags: , ,

fresh-off-the-cob corn chowder

We’re a soup lovin’ crowd here at Cook the Book Fridays. This is the third one we’ve made, and we’ve barely cracked the book open. August might not be my idea of hot soup weather, but corn has just come into season here in New York. There are mountains of beautiful ears at the Greenmarket, so I’m happy to oblige our liquid dinner cravings with this Fresh-Off-The-Cob Corn Chowder.  Along with potatoes, fresh sweet corn forms the base of this chowder, which also has sautéed aromatics like onion, garlic, celery and fennel stalks. Dorie says the fennel is optional, but I really think it adds a wonderful flavor here (and is a good way to use a stalk of two after you’ve done something else with the main bulb). About half of the veggies are cooked and pureed with the soup stock to make a creamy base that, thanks to the starchy corn and potatoes, contains no dairy, and the other half is sautéed and added at the end for fresh texture. I did not use the bacon in the recipe, as I forgot to get it at the store, but I had some smoked turkey breast to give it a similar flavor (I would have used turkey bacon anyway).

One of the best parts about making a soup like this is getting to garnish it. I always enjoy planning out the finishing touches. Here I went with the extra sautéed corn and veggie bits, cubed potatoes, pulled smoked turkey, a little sour cream, some fennel fronds and a dustings of fennel pollen and black pepper. The soup is excellent, and I really enjoyed my leftovers the next day heated up just a bit warmer than room temperature.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here), and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

Everyday Dorie: Mushroom-Bacon Galette

June 14, 2019 at 5:31 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, other savory, savory things, veggies | 4 Comments
Tags: , ,

mushroom-bacon galette

It’s fun to do a little savory baking now and again. And it’s rewarding, too…as a result of my baking efforts today, I’ll be spending my Friday night with a glass of rosé and a nice slice of Mushroom-Bacon Galette. That’s my idea of a good time.

People always say that galette is pie for beginners. I guess that’s true because it’s so easy to make and it’s supposed to look rustically imperfect, but it’s every bit as good as pie. Maybe this will be my “summer of the galette”…sweet and savory all season! You can use store-bought pie dough, but Dorie’s galette dough recipe is quickly made in the food processor, and it’s pretty foolproof. For the filling, bacon is crisped, walnuts are chopped and mushrooms are cooked down with some aromatics. This thing smells amazing in the oven! Out of the oven, it’s salty and earthy– umami in a pastry crust. It will be a perfect summer dinner with a salad and a glass of chilled vino.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan (it’s also here), and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

Everyday Dorie: Potato Tourte

March 8, 2019 at 5:54 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, other savory, savory things, veggies | 10 Comments
Tags: , ,

potato tourte

I thought about not making the Potato Tourte this week for Cook the Book Fridays. It’s not that a potato gratin wrapped inside puff pastry isn’t appealing to me. It’s that it’s too appealing to me. I decided that if I made about half a recipe (which I totally eyeballed) in one of my 6-inch pie plates, then things wouldn’t spiral too out of control.

There are certain things that I am notoriously stingy with. Parchment paper is one…I will re-use a piece until it basically turns to ashes on a sheet tray. Puff pastry is another. There is no trimming of excess and there is never waste. I decided to allocate one half of a sheet of puff pastry to this project (the other half I’m saving intact for something else later this month). I wanted my top crust to look great, so I cut that round first. Then I patchworked the bottom crust in with the rest of the sheet and the off cuts from the top round. It looked kind of crazy pre-filling, but seems to have worked fine. I popped all that in the fridge while I assembled my oniony, garlicky herb mix (using fresh parsley, basil puree that I keep in the freezer and dried thyme) and my butter bits (which I actually grated so I could disperse them more evenly) and lemon strips (which I also actually grated) and mandolined a couple of yukon golds without any incident (I did not soak them in water). It didn’t take too long before everything was stacked and egg washed and in the oven.

For the final third of the baking time, cream gets drizzled into the steam vent in the top. I had a fair amount of butter bubbling and sizzling out of the tourte and onto the baking sheet, so I decided to only use a couple of tablespoons of cream instead of the half cup I otherwise would have. It seemed to be telling me it could barley contain all the fat that was in it already. Hahaha.

This is truly delicious. I served it with a bitter radicchio salad and a glass white wine to cut through the richness. Not only do you get the beautiful layers in the puff pastry, put also beautiful layers of creamy herbed potato. As yummy as this was for dinner, I’m looking forward to brunch leftovers tomorrow.

potato tourte

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

Everyday Dorie: Potato Chowder Lots of Ways

January 11, 2019 at 3:15 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, soups, veggies | 13 Comments
Tags: , , ,

potato chowder lots of ways

Well, it’s officially frigid here and all I want to make for dinner is soup. Luckily, Cook the Book Fridays picked Dorie’s Potato Chowder Lots of Ways for the recipe of the month. I like the “lots of ways” bit because it pretty much tells me I’ll have room to improvise, which I usually do anyway but having permission is a refreshing change. Hahaha. I actually didn’t really veer too far off base here, just a few tweaks and some flavoring and topping customization. This is really a potato and onion chowder, using just about every allium you can think of: yellow onions, leeks, shallots and garlic. Any not on this list can be added as a topping. I first pre-crisped some turkey bacon bits in my Dutch oven and set them aside for garnish. As the alliums cooked down all soft and sweet, I seasoned them with Old Bay. My dad used to have a boat on the Chesapeake, so I love that stuff. I never peel potatoes if I don’t have to, and didn’t see a reason to here, so I left the skins on mine.

I don’t always love how I feel after eating soup with a cream base, so I skipped the cream here and instead stole a couple of ladlefuls of soup out of my pot (the liquid with some potatoes and onions) and whizzed it really smooth in my blender. I stirred that back into the soup to give the base a thicker, velvety texture and then added about 1/4 cup of 2% milk just to give it a slightly lighter, more chowdery, color. Because I’d been restrained with the dairy in the soup, I felt no guilt when adding a blop of crème fraîche as a topping. Also on top of the “my way” chowder, I sprinkled those bacon bits, some sliced scallion and some tiny potatoes that I crisped up in olive oil, crouton-style. Delicious. I will definitely try this chowder other ways as the season goes on.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Everyday Dorie: Roasted Squash Hummus

December 14, 2018 at 10:21 pm | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, snacks, veggies | 14 Comments
Tags: , ,

roasted squash hummus

You know I’m having an exciting Friday night when I’m writing up a blog post about hummus! At least this Roasted Squash Hummus has a little something different going on. In place of the traditional chickpeas, this hummus gets its body from a roasted squash. Of course there’s tahini and lemon, but also some cool ingredients like za’atar and pomegranate molasses. I used a small carnival squash, and although Dorie just has you mash together the ingredients with a fork, I put everything into my mini food processor and gave it a whiz. I plated it up with a smear of thick yogurt, drizzles of olive oil and more pom molasses and a sprinkling of toasted pumpkin seeds. It’s earthy and creamy with a touch of sweetness. This was more interesting than my normal Sunday football food, and I thought it made a nice dip for veggies and pita chips.

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Everyday Dorie: Maple-Syrup-and-Mustard Brussels Sprouts

November 9, 2018 at 12:01 am | Posted in cook the book fridays, everyday dorie, groups, savory things, veggies | 19 Comments
Tags: , ,

maple-syrup-and-mustard brussels sprouts

I was never the kid who pushed away the dish of brussels sprouts. In fact, they were always a highlight of Thanksgiving dinner, right up there with stuffing! I know…weird, right? When I make sprouts at home, I usually just simply roast them with a little s&p. Sometimes I shred and sauté them. I’m always happy to try out something new, though. These Maple-Syrup-and-Mustard Brussels Sprouts are steamed first and then they’re finished off in a skillet, where they take on some color before being combined with the maple and mustard and some crispy bacon (of the turkey variety for me). They’re sweet and savory and a little zingy. And steaming is a really easy way to cook them, so I don’t know why I haven’t done it before. I have a little container of leftovers that I plan to heat up and top with a fried egg, and I’m so looking forward to it!

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Torte Milanese

October 6, 2015 at 11:41 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 5 Comments
Tags: ,

torte milanese

This is my “take two” of Michel Richard’s Torte Milanese recipe.  I did the first take last fall, when we prepared Richard’s homemade puff recipe and did other stuff with it.  Pictures of that version were lost, unfortunately, and were never to be seen again, except perhaps by the hackers who encrypted them a few weeks later.  Hope those bastards got hungry.

The only silver lining to all that mess is that I was encouraged to make this tasty torte, which is a full meal of layered scrambled eggs, cheese, veggies and meat encased in puff pastry, again.  And I got to play around with it a little this time.  I used chard in lieu of spinach for the greens, I left out the ham layer and instead crisped up some bacon and cooked them into the scrambled eggs, which I flavored with the herbs I had on hand (thyme and basil), and I used a mix of cheddar and Swiss cheeses.  Even my roasted red pepper layer was actually a combo of red and yellow ones.  I would say that the puff stayed the same, except I used store-bought instead of homemade this time.  Its savory, salty (in a good way) and very filling.  Plus, the tall slices look great with all those layers of good stuff.

The recipe says to bake the torte at 350°, but I don’t think puff pastry bakes well that low, so I started it at 400° and turned it down at the halfway point for the rest of the bake.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

TWD BWJ Rewind: Cheese and Tomato Galette

September 29, 2015 at 1:04 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 13 Comments
Tags: ,

cheese and tomato galette

Flo Braker’s Cheese and Tomato Galette is more of a revisit than a rewind.  I first made this one with the group a couple of years ago, but I’ve also made it many times since.  I hope I’ll still see tomatoes at the Greenmarket here for a couple more weekends, so I can squeeze in one more of these this year!

The dough is the only tricky part about this galette.  It bakes up nice and crisp, but it starts out super sticky.  I roll it well-chilled and directly on the parchment I’m going to use for baking so I move it as little as possible.  After the dough is rolled into a circle, it’s then easy to just slide the parchment onto the baking sheet, top it and pleat it up. 

The recipe specifies the filling as tomatoes, basil, mozzarella and jack, but I play around with the herbs and melting cheeses depending on what’s in the fridge.  I’ve used dill, cilantro or parsley (even pesto–which is amazing!) to replace the basil, and while I do always like to use the mozzarella in here, I’ve subbed the Monterey jack with cheddar, provolone, etc.  Also, I like to season the tomatoes with salt and pepper.  If the tomatoes give off some liquid while the galette bakes, I just tip it out with a spoon at the half-way point so it won’t make the tart watery.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan, or look around…it’s out there.   Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll for other rewinds this week!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Alsatian Onion Tart

November 4, 2014 at 2:48 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 10 Comments
Tags: ,

alsatian onion tart

This Alsatian Onion Tart is our third  Michel Richard puff pastry recipe in a row!  This is a great easy recipe to toss together for brunch or lunch (or dinner) if you have some puff in the freezer already.  It’s actually designed to use scrap puff pastry that’s been rerolled, but I didn’t have enough scrap and sacrificed a fresh sheet.  It was worth it.

This is very similar to the flammkuchen I like to get at German beer hall in my neighborhood (except I think they use a flatbread base instead of puff pastry).  It’s almost like a pizza topped with slightly sweet, soft onions simmered in chicken broth, bacon and a touch of cream.  I put some fresh thyme on mine, too…hopefully the Alsatians won’t mind.

While the recipe specifies four very large onions for the topping, two of my onions were most definitely small and the other two were medium-sized at best.  I was crying so freaking much chopping them, I don’t think I could have physically handled anymore.  I had plenty for a nice thick layer anyway.  I actually thought it looked like too much cooked onion but I put it all on there.  Also, I used turkey bacon instead of slab bacon so I skipped the blanching step and just gave it a quick sauté.  Oh yeah, and I baked my tart at 400° because I like puff to be a little browner than I’ve found I can get it at 350°. You can prep the components a day in advance and assemble the tart right before baking.

The recipe says this tart is best just baked, but I had leftovers that I reheated in a 325° oven the next day, and they were great.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Summer Vegetable Tart

July 16, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 14 Comments
Tags: ,

summer vegetable tart

Gale Gand’s Summer Vegetable Tart at first sounded so promising.  My CSA is throwing all kinds of vegetables my way, and it can be a challenge (a fun challenge) to get them taken care of before the next week’s batch takes over my fridge.  I was kind of surprised, then, to see that the “summer vegetables” in the recipe are just garlic, onions, red peppers and mushrooms.  Those are more like “whenever vegetables,” so I took some creative license and added zucchini and summer squash to the mix.

The tart is simple enough– the shell is just layers of butter-brushed phyllo baked till golden.  The veggies are sautéed separately and then loaded into the baked shell along with some cheese.  That’s it, all done and ready to serve.  It’s okay.  It certainly isn’t bad, just a little dull, even though I tried to pep mine up with some hot pepper flakes and fresh parsley.  The phyllo shell gets soggy in a hurry, and because the filling is never baked, it stays loose and messy.  I prefer the Cheese and Tomato Galette we did last month, and I think a riff on that will be my next attempt at a summer veggie tart.

We’re going without hosts now for TWD, so for the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Next Page »

Blog at WordPress.com.
Entries and comments feeds.