Maple-Syrup-and-Mustard Brussels Sprouts from Everyday Dorie

November 9, 2018 at 12:01 am | Posted in groups, savory things, veggies | 18 Comments
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maple-syrup-and-mustard brussels sprouts

I was never the kid who pushed away the dish of brussels sprouts. In fact, they were always a highlight of Thanksgiving dinner, right up there with stuffing! I know…weird, right? When I make sprouts at home, I usually just simply roast them with a little s&p. Sometimes I shred and sauté them. I’m always happy to try out something new, though. These Maple-Syrup-and-Mustard Brussels Sprouts are steamed first and then they’re finished off in a skillet, where they take on some color before being combined with the maple and mustard and some crispy bacon (of the turkey variety for me). They’re sweet and savory and a little zingy. And steaming is a really easy way to cook them, so I don’t know why I haven’t done it before. I have a little container of leftovers that I plan to heat up and top with a fried egg, and I’m so looking forward to it!

For the recipe, see Everyday Dorie by Dorie Greenspan, and head over to Cook the Book Fridays to see how the group liked this one.

 

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Torte Milanese

October 6, 2015 at 11:41 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 5 Comments
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torte milanese

This is my “take two” of Michel Richard’s Torte Milanese recipe.  I did the first take last fall, when we prepared Richard’s homemade puff recipe and did other stuff with it.  Pictures of that version were lost, unfortunately, and were never to be seen again, except perhaps by the hackers who encrypted them a few weeks later.  Hope those bastards got hungry.

The only silver lining to all that mess is that I was encouraged to make this tasty torte, which is a full meal of layered scrambled eggs, cheese, veggies and meat encased in puff pastry, again.  And I got to play around with it a little this time.  I used chard in lieu of spinach for the greens, I left out the ham layer and instead crisped up some bacon and cooked them into the scrambled eggs, which I flavored with the herbs I had on hand (thyme and basil), and I used a mix of cheddar and Swiss cheeses.  Even my roasted red pepper layer was actually a combo of red and yellow ones.  I would say that the puff stayed the same, except I used store-bought instead of homemade this time.  Its savory, salty (in a good way) and very filling.  Plus, the tall slices look great with all those layers of good stuff.

The recipe says to bake the torte at 350°, but I don’t think puff pastry bakes well that low, so I started it at 400° and turned it down at the halfway point for the rest of the bake.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

TWD BWJ Rewind: Cheese and Tomato Galette

September 29, 2015 at 1:04 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 13 Comments
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cheese and tomato galette

Flo Braker’s Cheese and Tomato Galette is more of a revisit than a rewind.  I first made this one with the group a couple of years ago, but I’ve also made it many times since.  I hope I’ll still see tomatoes at the Greenmarket here for a couple more weekends, so I can squeeze in one more of these this year!

The dough is the only tricky part about this galette.  It bakes up nice and crisp, but it starts out super sticky.  I roll it well-chilled and directly on the parchment I’m going to use for baking so I move it as little as possible.  After the dough is rolled into a circle, it’s then easy to just slide the parchment onto the baking sheet, top it and pleat it up. 

The recipe specifies the filling as tomatoes, basil, mozzarella and jack, but I play around with the herbs and melting cheeses depending on what’s in the fridge.  I’ve used dill, cilantro or parsley (even pesto–which is amazing!) to replace the basil, and while I do always like to use the mozzarella in here, I’ve subbed the Monterey jack with cheddar, provolone, etc.  Also, I like to season the tomatoes with salt and pepper.  If the tomatoes give off some liquid while the galette bakes, I just tip it out with a spoon at the half-way point so it won’t make the tart watery.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan, or look around…it’s out there.   Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll for other rewinds this week!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Alsatian Onion Tart

November 4, 2014 at 2:48 pm | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 10 Comments
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alsatian onion tart

This Alsatian Onion Tart is our third  Michel Richard puff pastry recipe in a row!  This is a great easy recipe to toss together for brunch or lunch (or dinner) if you have some puff in the freezer already.  It’s actually designed to use scrap puff pastry that’s been rerolled, but I didn’t have enough scrap and sacrificed a fresh sheet.  It was worth it.

This is very similar to the flammkuchen I like to get at German beer hall in my neighborhood (except I think they use a flatbread base instead of puff pastry).  It’s almost like a pizza topped with slightly sweet, soft onions simmered in chicken broth, bacon and a touch of cream.  I put some fresh thyme on mine, too…hopefully the Alsatians won’t mind.

While the recipe specifies four very large onions for the topping, two of my onions were most definitely small and the other two were medium-sized at best.  I was crying so freaking much chopping them, I don’t think I could have physically handled anymore.  I had plenty for a nice thick layer anyway.  I actually thought it looked like too much cooked onion but I put it all on there.  Also, I used turkey bacon instead of slab bacon so I skipped the blanching step and just gave it a quick sauté.  Oh yeah, and I baked my tart at 400° because I like puff to be a little browner than I’ve found I can get it at 350°. You can prep the components a day in advance and assemble the tart right before baking.

The recipe says this tart is best just baked, but I had leftovers that I reheated in a 325° oven the next day, and they were great.

For the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Summer Vegetable Tart

July 16, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 14 Comments
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summer vegetable tart

Gale Gand’s Summer Vegetable Tart at first sounded so promising.  My CSA is throwing all kinds of vegetables my way, and it can be a challenge (a fun challenge) to get them taken care of before the next week’s batch takes over my fridge.  I was kind of surprised, then, to see that the “summer vegetables” in the recipe are just garlic, onions, red peppers and mushrooms.  Those are more like “whenever vegetables,” so I took some creative license and added zucchini and summer squash to the mix.

The tart is simple enough– the shell is just layers of butter-brushed phyllo baked till golden.  The veggies are sautéed separately and then loaded into the baked shell along with some cheese.  That’s it, all done and ready to serve.  It’s okay.  It certainly isn’t bad, just a little dull, even though I tried to pep mine up with some hot pepper flakes and fresh parsley.  The phyllo shell gets soggy in a hurry, and because the filling is never baked, it stays loose and messy.  I prefer the Cheese and Tomato Galette we did last month, and I think a riff on that will be my next attempt at a summer veggie tart.

We’re going without hosts now for TWD, so for the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan.  Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Tuesdays with Dorie BWJ: Cheese and Tomato Galette

June 18, 2013 at 12:01 am | Posted in BWJ, groups, other savory, savory things, tuesdays with dorie, veggies | 21 Comments
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cheese and tomato galette

Flo Braker’s Cheese and Tomato Galette uses the same cornmeal and sour cream dough as the Crunchy Summer Fruit Galette we did last summer.  The dough was still as sticky as I remembered, but I rolled and formed it directly on the parchment I used for baking, so I didn’t tear my hair out. 

The recipe specifies the filling as tomatoes, basil, mozzarella and jack, but you can play around with the herbs and melting cheeses.  You can see I used dill in lieu of basil, and while I did have mozz in here, I used a more flavorful washed rind cow cheese instead of Monterey jack.  Also, I sprinkled a little s&p on the tomatoes because I like them seasoned. When I turned my galette in the oven, I noticed the tomatoes had given off some liquid.  I just tipped it out with a spoon so it wouldn’t make my tart watery.

I split this with my husband– it’s little.  With a salad and a glass of wine, it was a nice summery dinner.  I have an extra round of dough in the freezer, so I’ll make this one again.

cheese and tomato galette

We’re going without hosts now for TWD, so for the recipe, see Baking with Julia by Dorie Greenspan, or look around…it’s out there.   Don’t forget to check out the rest of the TWD Blogroll!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Capers and Lemony Browned Butter

November 22, 2011 at 6:46 pm | Posted in savory things, veggies | 4 Comments
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roasted Brussels sprouts with capers and lemony browned butter

I was never the kid who picked her Brussels sprouts off the plate and threw them across the room.  Nope, I’ve always liked them (bite-sized cabbages are cool!), and since in my house they’re not just a once-a-year neglected side dish, I’m always on the hunt for fun ways to fix them.  Roasting is one of my favorite techniques to prepare sprouts…mostly because you can just toss them in the oven and basically leave them be while you focus on other things, but also because you get a combo of tender spouts and crunchy stray leaves.  A new book that I’ve really been enjoying called All About Roasting: A New Approach to a Classic Art by Molly Stevens shows a new twist on roasted sprouts by tossing them in a dressing of brown butter, lemon juice and capers.  I’ve apparently been on a brown butter kick lately, but it really does add a nutty flavor that makes things extra-special.  The lemon juice and capers add a bright acidic pop to the little-bitty cabbages.  I gave this recipe a trial run a couple of weeks ago, and liked it so much that I’m making it again for Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday.

Happy Thanksgiving!  And no pie until you finish your sprouts!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Capers and Lemony Browned Butter— makes four servings
adapted from All About Roasting: A New Approach to a Classic Art by Molly Stevens

1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon mustard seeds, yellow or brown
2 tablespoons capers, drained
1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice, plus more if needed

– Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat to 425 degrees (400 degrees convection). If desired, line a heavy-duty rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper.

– Depending on their size, cut the Brussels sprouts in halves or quarters; you want them to be small enough to be bite-sized. Place in a large bowl and toss with the olive oil and salt and pepper to taste. Arrange the sprouts in a single layer on the baking sheet. Don’t worry if some of the leaves fall off. Include these when roasting; they will crisp up, adding a nice crunch to the dish.

– Slide the Brussels sprouts into the oven and roast, turning once or twice with a metal spatula to promote even cooking, until the sprouts are tender throughout and smaller bits or leaves that have fallen off are browned and crunchy, 20 to 25 minutes. Test for doneness by piercing a sprout with the tip of a paring knife, but to be sure, nab one off the baking sheet, let it cool slightly, and taste; it should be tender and sweet.

– As the sprouts roast, melt the butter in a small skillet or heavy saucepan (it should be no more than 6 inches across or the butter will burn). Cook over medium heat until the butter is melted. Add the mustard seeds, increase the heat to medium-high, and cook, watching the pan carefully and swirling frequently, until the butter begins to foam and turns golden brown, about 2 minutes. Add the capers and lemon juice — the butter will sizzle — and immediately remove from the heat. Season with salt and pepper to taste and keep warm until the Brussels sprouts are ready.

– Transfer the Brussels sprouts to a serving dish and add the browned butter. Toss to coat. Taste for salt, pepper, and lemon and serve immediately.

Please note that the publisher, W.W. Norton, sent me a copy of this book.

Raw Asparagus, Pecorino and Red Onion Salad

May 22, 2010 at 11:24 am | Posted in savory things, veggies | 9 Comments

raw asparagus, pecorino and red onion salad 

What is that??  Does seeing a salad here blow your mind just a little?  Would you be surprised if I told you that I love veggies even more than sweets?  My head is positively spinning seeing all things green popping up at the farmers’ market.  I am snapping up asparagus while I can, and this raw salad is my favorite new thing to do with it.  I know that raw asparagus sounds a little strange, but I have been eating up huge bowlfuls of this stuff all month long.

Take those skinny-minny stalks of raw asparagus, add red onion, sharp pecorino and a quick dressing and you get something super fresh, crisp, and snappy.  Not to mention so easy…my only real advice is to use a big cutting board for prep, because otherwise those little coins of asparagus will want to go mobile all over your counter. 

Raw Asparagus, Pecorino and Red Onion Salad– makes 6 to 8 servings
from a recipe by Anne Burrell
 

1 bunch pencil (the skinny stuff) asparagus, tough bottom stems removed
1 small red onion, finely diced
1 cup coarsely grated aged pecorino
1/2 cup red wine vinegar
extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt

  -Cut the asparagus, including the tips into very thin slices, crosswise and place in a medium bowl. Add the red onion and pecorino and toss to combine. 

-Dress with the vinegar, olive oil and salt and toss again. This salad should be fairly heavily dressed. The vinegar will sort of “cook” or tenderize the asparagus.  It is best to do this about an hour or so in advance to let the flavors marry.

Late summer…on a plate

September 4, 2009 at 3:53 am | Posted in savory things, veggies | 12 Comments

tomato, basil and buffalo mozzarella salad

Raw Pickled Beets

July 2, 2009 at 4:59 pm | Posted in pickles, savory things, veggies | 13 Comments

raw pickled beets

Something about pickling has always sounded so complicated to me…brines versus cures, acidity and fermentation, blah, blah, blah.  I’ll just leave the mysterious intricacies of anaerobic fermentation up to Rick, and not clog up my own (much needed) personal brainspace, thanks very much.  But a quick pickle…God, even I should be able to do something called a “quick pickle,” right?

A good place to start for beet-loving, picking virgins like myself is this recipe from last month’s Martha Stewart Living.  Trust me, these are easy…so easy, in fact, that after making one batch, I considered myself expert enough to make a second!  The first batch was made with red beets, and the second with the striped variety (although the stripes were basically washed away with the hot pickling liquid).  Don’t fear the Thai chile…these are not spicy pickles; a gentle backnote is all you get from its heat.

Remember that these pickles are not canned and sealed in a water bath, so do get them into the fridge straightaway and store them there.  Give the beets a day or two to relax in their bath before opening the jar.  Then they’ll be ready to eat straight-up, to be made into a snappy salad with feta and mint, or to be put Aussie-style on a burger (and preferably enjoyed with a Coopers Sparkling).  Supposedly they’ll keep for a month, but I can guarantee you that mine won’t make it a week.

raw pickled beets

Raw Pickled Beets– makes one jar
adapted from Martha Stewart Living, May 2009 

2 red or golden beets
1 fresh Thai chile
1 cup rice vinegar (not the seasoned kind)
1/4 cup sugar
1 fresh bay leaf
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns

-Scrub, trim, and peel your two beets.  Slice thinly (a mandoline works best), and transfer to a jar.

-Split the fresh Thai chile in half.  Bring chile, rice vinegar, sugar, fresh bay leaf, and black peppercorns to a boil in a small saucepan.

-Pour hot mixture over beets.  Seal jar and refrigerate.  Beets will keep for one month.

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